Facial Myokymia and Hemifacial Spasm in Multiple Sclerosis: A Descriptive Study on Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes

Iris V. Marin Collazo, William Tobin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Facial Myokymia and hemifacial spasm have been associated with multiple sclerosis; however, their etiology and clinical outcome is uncertain. Here, we describe the clinical, radiologic features, and treatment outcomes of a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis and history of facial myokymia or hemifacial spasm. Methodology: We reviewed the clinical features, radiologic features, and treatment outcomes of 35 patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and facial myokymia (28) or hemifacial spasm (7) seen at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN). Results: Facial myokymia was associated with a clinical or radiologic relapse in 11 of 28 patients. In 27 of 28 patients with facial myokymia, symptom resolution occurred within months regardless of treatment. An ipsilateral pontine lesion was found in 3 of 7 cases with hemifacial spasm. Hemifacial spasm was associated with a clinical or radiologic relapse in 3 of 7 cases. Hemifacial spasm resolved within 4 years in 5 of 7 cases, with the remaining cases persisting up to 9 years despite treatment. Conclusions: Facial myokymia and hemifacial spasm occurring in patients with multiple sclerosis is associated with an ipsilateral pontine MRI lesion in a minority of patients. Facial myokymia is a self-limited process while hemifacial spasm can be persistent in a minority of patients, despite treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalNeurologist
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Facial Nerve Diseases
Hemifacial Spasm
Multiple Sclerosis
Recurrence
Clinical Studies
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • facial myokymia
  • facial nerve disorders
  • facial spasm
  • hemifacial spasm
  • movement disorders
  • multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Facial Myokymia and Hemifacial Spasm in Multiple Sclerosis : A Descriptive Study on Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes. / Marin Collazo, Iris V.; Tobin, William.

In: Neurologist, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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