Extract from herniaria hirsuta coats calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and blocks their adhesion to renal epithelial cells

Fouad Atmani, Gerard Farell, John C Lieske

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The interaction of calcium oxalate crystals with renal epithelial cells is a critical event in kidney stone formation. In this study we assessed the effect of aqueous extract from Herniaria hirsuta on the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals to cultured renal cells. Materials and Methods: Madin Darby canine kidney cells were used as a model for studying the adhesion of radioactive COM crystals in the presence and absence of plant extract. Results: COM crystal binding to cells was inhibited by extract in a concentration dependent manner. Prior exposure of crystals but not cells to extract blocked crystal binding, suggesting that plant molecules can coat and exert their effect at the crystal surface. Crystal attachment appeared related to membrane fluidity since crystal adhesion increased at higher vs lower temperatures (37C vs 0C) and Herniaria extract altered crystal adhesion only under conditions of increased fluidity (increased temperature). Extract also displaced a significant portion of prebound crystals without apparent effects on cell function or the morphology of preexisting calcium oxalate crystals. Herniaria extract exerted no adverse or toxic effect on cells, which proliferated normally in its presence even at relatively high concentrations. Conclusions: Our current data suggest a mechanism whereby Herniaria hirsuta extract used in traditional medicine might prevent and possibly eliminate preexisting kidney stones. Further characterization of the active compound(s) could identify a new candidate drug for patients with nephrolithiasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1510-1514
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume172
Issue number4 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Caryophyllaceae
Calcium Oxalate
Epithelial Cells
Kidney
Kidney Calculi
Nephrolithiasis
Membrane Fluidity
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Temperature
Poisons
Plant Extracts
Traditional Medicine
Cell Extracts
Cultured Cells
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Calcium oxalate
  • Caryophyllaceae
  • Epithelium
  • Kidney
  • Kidney calculi

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Extract from herniaria hirsuta coats calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and blocks their adhesion to renal epithelial cells. / Atmani, Fouad; Farell, Gerard; Lieske, John C.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 172, No. 4 I, 10.2004, p. 1510-1514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2a60133abbea4b32810134d1276ca0a1,
title = "Extract from herniaria hirsuta coats calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and blocks their adhesion to renal epithelial cells",
abstract = "Purpose: The interaction of calcium oxalate crystals with renal epithelial cells is a critical event in kidney stone formation. In this study we assessed the effect of aqueous extract from Herniaria hirsuta on the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals to cultured renal cells. Materials and Methods: Madin Darby canine kidney cells were used as a model for studying the adhesion of radioactive COM crystals in the presence and absence of plant extract. Results: COM crystal binding to cells was inhibited by extract in a concentration dependent manner. Prior exposure of crystals but not cells to extract blocked crystal binding, suggesting that plant molecules can coat and exert their effect at the crystal surface. Crystal attachment appeared related to membrane fluidity since crystal adhesion increased at higher vs lower temperatures (37C vs 0C) and Herniaria extract altered crystal adhesion only under conditions of increased fluidity (increased temperature). Extract also displaced a significant portion of prebound crystals without apparent effects on cell function or the morphology of preexisting calcium oxalate crystals. Herniaria extract exerted no adverse or toxic effect on cells, which proliferated normally in its presence even at relatively high concentrations. Conclusions: Our current data suggest a mechanism whereby Herniaria hirsuta extract used in traditional medicine might prevent and possibly eliminate preexisting kidney stones. Further characterization of the active compound(s) could identify a new candidate drug for patients with nephrolithiasis.",
keywords = "Calcium oxalate, Caryophyllaceae, Epithelium, Kidney, Kidney calculi",
author = "Fouad Atmani and Gerard Farell and Lieske, {John C}",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1097/01.ju.0000131004.03795.c5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "172",
pages = "1510--1514",
journal = "Journal of Urology",
issn = "0022-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4 I",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extract from herniaria hirsuta coats calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and blocks their adhesion to renal epithelial cells

AU - Atmani, Fouad

AU - Farell, Gerard

AU - Lieske, John C

PY - 2004/10

Y1 - 2004/10

N2 - Purpose: The interaction of calcium oxalate crystals with renal epithelial cells is a critical event in kidney stone formation. In this study we assessed the effect of aqueous extract from Herniaria hirsuta on the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals to cultured renal cells. Materials and Methods: Madin Darby canine kidney cells were used as a model for studying the adhesion of radioactive COM crystals in the presence and absence of plant extract. Results: COM crystal binding to cells was inhibited by extract in a concentration dependent manner. Prior exposure of crystals but not cells to extract blocked crystal binding, suggesting that plant molecules can coat and exert their effect at the crystal surface. Crystal attachment appeared related to membrane fluidity since crystal adhesion increased at higher vs lower temperatures (37C vs 0C) and Herniaria extract altered crystal adhesion only under conditions of increased fluidity (increased temperature). Extract also displaced a significant portion of prebound crystals without apparent effects on cell function or the morphology of preexisting calcium oxalate crystals. Herniaria extract exerted no adverse or toxic effect on cells, which proliferated normally in its presence even at relatively high concentrations. Conclusions: Our current data suggest a mechanism whereby Herniaria hirsuta extract used in traditional medicine might prevent and possibly eliminate preexisting kidney stones. Further characterization of the active compound(s) could identify a new candidate drug for patients with nephrolithiasis.

AB - Purpose: The interaction of calcium oxalate crystals with renal epithelial cells is a critical event in kidney stone formation. In this study we assessed the effect of aqueous extract from Herniaria hirsuta on the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals to cultured renal cells. Materials and Methods: Madin Darby canine kidney cells were used as a model for studying the adhesion of radioactive COM crystals in the presence and absence of plant extract. Results: COM crystal binding to cells was inhibited by extract in a concentration dependent manner. Prior exposure of crystals but not cells to extract blocked crystal binding, suggesting that plant molecules can coat and exert their effect at the crystal surface. Crystal attachment appeared related to membrane fluidity since crystal adhesion increased at higher vs lower temperatures (37C vs 0C) and Herniaria extract altered crystal adhesion only under conditions of increased fluidity (increased temperature). Extract also displaced a significant portion of prebound crystals without apparent effects on cell function or the morphology of preexisting calcium oxalate crystals. Herniaria extract exerted no adverse or toxic effect on cells, which proliferated normally in its presence even at relatively high concentrations. Conclusions: Our current data suggest a mechanism whereby Herniaria hirsuta extract used in traditional medicine might prevent and possibly eliminate preexisting kidney stones. Further characterization of the active compound(s) could identify a new candidate drug for patients with nephrolithiasis.

KW - Calcium oxalate

KW - Caryophyllaceae

KW - Epithelium

KW - Kidney

KW - Kidney calculi

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4544243071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4544243071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.ju.0000131004.03795.c5

DO - 10.1097/01.ju.0000131004.03795.c5

M3 - Article

C2 - 15371881

AN - SCOPUS:4544243071

VL - 172

SP - 1510

EP - 1514

JO - Journal of Urology

JF - Journal of Urology

SN - 0022-5347

IS - 4 I

ER -