Extending venous thromboembolism secondary prevention with apixaban in cancer patients: The EVE trial

Robert D. McBane, Charles L. Loprinzi, Aneel Ashrani, Charles J. Lenz, Damon Houghton, Tyler Zemla, Jennifer G. Le-Rademacher, Waldemar E. Wysokinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Cancer-associated venous thromboembolism (VTE) carries a high rate of recurrence and death. Guidelines recommend continued anticoagulation therapy as long as active cancer persists. Apixaban 2.5 mg twice daily is the FDA-approved dose for secondary prevention regardless of VTE causation. Whether this apixaban dose is appropriate for secondary VTE prevention in cancer patients is not clear. The rationale and design of this investigator initiated phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, trial assessing apixaban 2.5 mg vs 5 mg twice daily for 12 months for the secondary VTE prevention in cancer patients (n = 370) who have completed 6 months (but no more than 12 months) of anticoagulation is provided (NCT03080883). Methods/Design: The primary study objective is to estimate differences in the combined rate of major plus clinically relevant non-major bleeding for apixaban 2.5 mg vs 5 mg twice daily. Secondary efficacy outcome is to assess rates of venous or arterial thromboembolism. Participating centers are chosen from the Academic and Community Cancer Research United (ACCRU) consortium. Conclusion: We anticipate these trial results to provide evidence supporting low-dose apixaban as a safe agent for secondary prevention of cancer-associated VTE for patients who have already completed 6-12 months of anticoagulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEuropean Journal of Haematology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Venous Thromboembolism
Secondary Prevention
Neoplasms
Thromboembolism
Causality
apixaban
Research Personnel
Guidelines
Hemorrhage
Recurrence
Mortality
Research

Keywords

  • apixaban
  • cancer
  • secondary prevention
  • venous thromboembolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Extending venous thromboembolism secondary prevention with apixaban in cancer patients : The EVE trial. / McBane, Robert D.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Ashrani, Aneel; Lenz, Charles J.; Houghton, Damon; Zemla, Tyler; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer G.; Wysokinski, Waldemar E.

In: European Journal of Haematology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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