Expression of p53 and 17p allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma

Julie M Cunningham, J. A. Lust, Daniel J Schaid, G. D. Bren, H. A. Carpenter, E. Rizza, J. S. Kovach, Stephen N Thibodeau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Mutations in the p53 gene are the most common genetic changes in cancer thus far. Many p53 mutations result in a protein product having a prolonged half-life compared to wild-type p53. The mutant protein is frequently detectable immunohistochemically, whereas the wild-type p53 present in normal cells is not. We examined 90 colorectal carcinomas for increased expression of p53 using 3 p53 specific monoclonal antibodies, PAb1801, PAb421, and PAb240. Overall, 70% of the colorectal carcinomas stained for p53. Each tumor's DNA was also assessed for loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 17p, the location of the p53 gene. Of those tumors that reacted with the anti-p53 antibodies, 76% showed loss on chromosome 17p. Tumors with loss of heterozygosity on 17p generally stained with all 3 antibodies, whereas those without loss tended to stain with just one antibody, typically PAb240. Fifteen tumors were examined for the presence of specific p53 mutations. A total of 10 mutations were found, 6 were missense and 2 were deletions, and all but one of the tumors with missense mutations stained for p53.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1974-1980
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Research
Volume52
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1992

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Loss of Heterozygosity
Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Mutation
p53 Genes
Chromosomes
Antibodies
Missense Mutation
Mutant Proteins
Half-Life
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Coloring Agents
Monoclonal Antibodies
DNA
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Expression of p53 and 17p allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma. / Cunningham, Julie M; Lust, J. A.; Schaid, Daniel J; Bren, G. D.; Carpenter, H. A.; Rizza, E.; Kovach, J. S.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 52, No. 7, 1992, p. 1974-1980.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cunningham, JM, Lust, JA, Schaid, DJ, Bren, GD, Carpenter, HA, Rizza, E, Kovach, JS & Thibodeau, SN 1992, 'Expression of p53 and 17p allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma', Cancer Research, vol. 52, no. 7, pp. 1974-1980.
Cunningham JM, Lust JA, Schaid DJ, Bren GD, Carpenter HA, Rizza E et al. Expression of p53 and 17p allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma. Cancer Research. 1992;52(7):1974-1980.
Cunningham, Julie M ; Lust, J. A. ; Schaid, Daniel J ; Bren, G. D. ; Carpenter, H. A. ; Rizza, E. ; Kovach, J. S. ; Thibodeau, Stephen N. / Expression of p53 and 17p allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma. In: Cancer Research. 1992 ; Vol. 52, No. 7. pp. 1974-1980.
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