Expression of a murine leukemia virus gag-Escherichia coli RNase HI fusion polyprotein significantly inhibits virus spread

M. VanBrocklin, A. L. Ferris, S. H. Hughes, M. J. Federspiel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

The antiviral strategy of capsid-targeted viral inactivation (CTVI) was designed to disable newly produced virions by fusing a Gag or Gag-Pol polyprotein to a degradative enzyme (e.g., a nuclease or protease) that would cause the degradative enzyme to be inserted into virions during assembly. Several new experimental approaches have been developed that increase the antiviral effect of the CTVI strategy on retroviral replication in vitro. A Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) Gag-Escherichia coli RNase HI fusion has a strong antiviral effect when used prophylactically, inhibiting the spread of Mo-MLV and reducing virus titers 1,500- to 2,500-fold. A significant (~100-fold) overall improvement of the CTVI prophylactic antiviral effect was produced by a modification in the culture conditions which presumably increases the efficiency of delivery and expression of the Mo-MLV Gag fusion polyproteins. The therapeutic effect of Mo-MLV Gag-RNase HI polyproteins is to reduce the production of infectious Mo-MLV up to 18-fold. An Mo-MLV Gag-degradative enzyme fusion junction was designed that can be cleaved by the Mo-MLV protease to release the degradative enzyme.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3312-3318
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of virology
Volume71
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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