Exploring human/animal intersections: Converging lines of evidence in comparative models of aging

John Q. Trojanowski, Joan C. Hendricks, Kathryn Jedrziewski, F. Brad Johnson, Kathryn E. Michel, Rebecka S. Hess, Michael P. Cancro, Meg M. Sleeper, Robert Pignolo, Karen L. Teff, Gustavo D. Aguirre, Virginia M.Y. Lee, Dennis F. Lawler, Allan I. Pack, Peter F. Davies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

At a symposium convened on March 8, 2007 by the Institute on Aging at the University of Pennsylvania, researchers from the University's Schools of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine explored the convergence of aging research emerging from the two schools. Studies in human patients, animal models, and companion animals have revealed different but complementary aspects of the aging process, ranging from fundamental biologic aspects of aging to the treatment of age-related diseases, both experimentally and in clinical practice. Participants concluded that neither animal nor human research alone will provide answers to most questions about the aging process. Instead, an optimal translational research model supports a bidirectional flow of information from animal models to clinical research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Animal Models
Research
Translational Medical Research
Veterinary Medicine
Pets
Research Personnel
Medicine
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Aging related diseases
  • Model systems for aging research
  • Normal aging
  • Organ specific mechanisms of aging in humans and animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Trojanowski, J. Q., Hendricks, J. C., Jedrziewski, K., Johnson, F. B., Michel, K. E., Hess, R. S., ... Davies, P. F. (2008). Exploring human/animal intersections: Converging lines of evidence in comparative models of aging. Alzheimer's and Dementia, 4(1), 1-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2007.09.007

Exploring human/animal intersections : Converging lines of evidence in comparative models of aging. / Trojanowski, John Q.; Hendricks, Joan C.; Jedrziewski, Kathryn; Johnson, F. Brad; Michel, Kathryn E.; Hess, Rebecka S.; Cancro, Michael P.; Sleeper, Meg M.; Pignolo, Robert; Teff, Karen L.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Lawler, Dennis F.; Pack, Allan I.; Davies, Peter F.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trojanowski, JQ, Hendricks, JC, Jedrziewski, K, Johnson, FB, Michel, KE, Hess, RS, Cancro, MP, Sleeper, MM, Pignolo, R, Teff, KL, Aguirre, GD, Lee, VMY, Lawler, DF, Pack, AI & Davies, PF 2008, 'Exploring human/animal intersections: Converging lines of evidence in comparative models of aging', Alzheimer's and Dementia, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 1-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2007.09.007
Trojanowski, John Q. ; Hendricks, Joan C. ; Jedrziewski, Kathryn ; Johnson, F. Brad ; Michel, Kathryn E. ; Hess, Rebecka S. ; Cancro, Michael P. ; Sleeper, Meg M. ; Pignolo, Robert ; Teff, Karen L. ; Aguirre, Gustavo D. ; Lee, Virginia M.Y. ; Lawler, Dennis F. ; Pack, Allan I. ; Davies, Peter F. / Exploring human/animal intersections : Converging lines of evidence in comparative models of aging. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia. 2008 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 1-5.
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