Examining health promotion interventions for patients with chronic conditions using a novel patient-centered complexity model

protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Amy E. Bodde, Nathan D. Shippee, Carl R. May, Frances S. Mair, Patricia J. Erwin, Mohammad H Murad, Victor Manuel Montori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Successful chronic care self-management requires adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviors, but many healthcare-based health promotion interventions have resulted in small and unsustainable changes in patient behavior. Patients with chronic conditions may already be overwhelmed by burdensome illnesses and treatments, and not have the capacity to respond well to the additional work required of behavior modifications. To explore this phenomenon, we will apply the cumulative complexity model (CCM), a patient-centered model of patient complexity, to a systematic review and meta-analysis of healthcare-based health behavior interventions. This systematic review will include randomized trials published between 2002 and 2012 that compared healthcare-based interventions aimed at improving healthy diet and physical activity in community dwelling adult patients with chronic conditions. After extracting study and risk of bias features from each trial, we will classify the interventions according to the conceptual model. We will then use meta-analysis and subgroup analysis to test hypotheses based on the conceptual model. Healthcare providers need evidence of successful health promoting interventions for patients with chronic conditions who display common behavioral risk factors. To better understand how patients respond to interventions, we will apply the CCM, which accounts for both the capacity of patients with chronic conditions and their treatment-related workload, and posits that a balance between capacity and workload predicts successful enactment of self-care. Analysis will also include whether patients with multiple chronic conditions respond differently to interventions compared to those with single chronic conditions. The results of this review will provide insights as to how patients with chronic conditions respond to health-promoting interventions. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42012003428.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29
Number of pages1
JournalSystematic Reviews
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Health Promotion
Meta-Analysis
Self Care
Workload
Delivery of Health Care
Independent Living
Behavior Therapy
Health Behavior
Health
Health Personnel
Exercise
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Examining health promotion interventions for patients with chronic conditions using a novel patient-centered complexity model : protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis. / Bodde, Amy E.; Shippee, Nathan D.; May, Carl R.; Mair, Frances S.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Murad, Mohammad H; Montori, Victor Manuel.

In: Systematic Reviews, Vol. 2, 2013, p. 29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1f9aa830b1e24954af2614e1c7bcce1f,
title = "Examining health promotion interventions for patients with chronic conditions using a novel patient-centered complexity model: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.",
abstract = "Successful chronic care self-management requires adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviors, but many healthcare-based health promotion interventions have resulted in small and unsustainable changes in patient behavior. Patients with chronic conditions may already be overwhelmed by burdensome illnesses and treatments, and not have the capacity to respond well to the additional work required of behavior modifications. To explore this phenomenon, we will apply the cumulative complexity model (CCM), a patient-centered model of patient complexity, to a systematic review and meta-analysis of healthcare-based health behavior interventions. This systematic review will include randomized trials published between 2002 and 2012 that compared healthcare-based interventions aimed at improving healthy diet and physical activity in community dwelling adult patients with chronic conditions. After extracting study and risk of bias features from each trial, we will classify the interventions according to the conceptual model. We will then use meta-analysis and subgroup analysis to test hypotheses based on the conceptual model. Healthcare providers need evidence of successful health promoting interventions for patients with chronic conditions who display common behavioral risk factors. To better understand how patients respond to interventions, we will apply the CCM, which accounts for both the capacity of patients with chronic conditions and their treatment-related workload, and posits that a balance between capacity and workload predicts successful enactment of self-care. Analysis will also include whether patients with multiple chronic conditions respond differently to interventions compared to those with single chronic conditions. The results of this review will provide insights as to how patients with chronic conditions respond to health-promoting interventions. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42012003428.",
author = "Bodde, {Amy E.} and Shippee, {Nathan D.} and May, {Carl R.} and Mair, {Frances S.} and Erwin, {Patricia J.} and Murad, {Mohammad H} and Montori, {Victor Manuel}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1186/2046-4053-2-29",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "29",
journal = "Systematic Reviews",
issn = "2046-4053",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Examining health promotion interventions for patients with chronic conditions using a novel patient-centered complexity model

T2 - protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

AU - Bodde, Amy E.

AU - Shippee, Nathan D.

AU - May, Carl R.

AU - Mair, Frances S.

AU - Erwin, Patricia J.

AU - Murad, Mohammad H

AU - Montori, Victor Manuel

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Successful chronic care self-management requires adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviors, but many healthcare-based health promotion interventions have resulted in small and unsustainable changes in patient behavior. Patients with chronic conditions may already be overwhelmed by burdensome illnesses and treatments, and not have the capacity to respond well to the additional work required of behavior modifications. To explore this phenomenon, we will apply the cumulative complexity model (CCM), a patient-centered model of patient complexity, to a systematic review and meta-analysis of healthcare-based health behavior interventions. This systematic review will include randomized trials published between 2002 and 2012 that compared healthcare-based interventions aimed at improving healthy diet and physical activity in community dwelling adult patients with chronic conditions. After extracting study and risk of bias features from each trial, we will classify the interventions according to the conceptual model. We will then use meta-analysis and subgroup analysis to test hypotheses based on the conceptual model. Healthcare providers need evidence of successful health promoting interventions for patients with chronic conditions who display common behavioral risk factors. To better understand how patients respond to interventions, we will apply the CCM, which accounts for both the capacity of patients with chronic conditions and their treatment-related workload, and posits that a balance between capacity and workload predicts successful enactment of self-care. Analysis will also include whether patients with multiple chronic conditions respond differently to interventions compared to those with single chronic conditions. The results of this review will provide insights as to how patients with chronic conditions respond to health-promoting interventions. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42012003428.

AB - Successful chronic care self-management requires adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviors, but many healthcare-based health promotion interventions have resulted in small and unsustainable changes in patient behavior. Patients with chronic conditions may already be overwhelmed by burdensome illnesses and treatments, and not have the capacity to respond well to the additional work required of behavior modifications. To explore this phenomenon, we will apply the cumulative complexity model (CCM), a patient-centered model of patient complexity, to a systematic review and meta-analysis of healthcare-based health behavior interventions. This systematic review will include randomized trials published between 2002 and 2012 that compared healthcare-based interventions aimed at improving healthy diet and physical activity in community dwelling adult patients with chronic conditions. After extracting study and risk of bias features from each trial, we will classify the interventions according to the conceptual model. We will then use meta-analysis and subgroup analysis to test hypotheses based on the conceptual model. Healthcare providers need evidence of successful health promoting interventions for patients with chronic conditions who display common behavioral risk factors. To better understand how patients respond to interventions, we will apply the CCM, which accounts for both the capacity of patients with chronic conditions and their treatment-related workload, and posits that a balance between capacity and workload predicts successful enactment of self-care. Analysis will also include whether patients with multiple chronic conditions respond differently to interventions compared to those with single chronic conditions. The results of this review will provide insights as to how patients with chronic conditions respond to health-promoting interventions. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42012003428.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886494575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84886494575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/2046-4053-2-29

DO - 10.1186/2046-4053-2-29

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 29

JO - Systematic Reviews

JF - Systematic Reviews

SN - 2046-4053

ER -