Ex vivo gene transfer of endothelial nitric oxide synthase to atherosclerotic rabbit aortic rings improves relaxations to acetylcholine

Geza Mozes, Iftikhar J. Kullo, Tibor G. Mohacsi, David G. Cable, David J. Spector, Thomas B. Crotty, Peter Gloviczki, Zvonimir S. Katusic, Timothy O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cholesterol feeding results in impaired endothelium dependent vasorelaxation. The role of nitric oxide in this process is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in cholesterol- induced vasomotor dysfunction by examining the effect of overexpression of eNOS in the hypercholesterolemic rabbit aorta on vascular reactivity. Vascular rings from the thoracic aorta of hypercholesterolemic rabbits were exposed ex vivo either to an adenoviral vector encoding endothelial nitric oxide synthase (AdeNOS) or Escherichia coli β Galactosidase (AdβGal). Transgene expression was examined by histochemistry for β galactosidase, immunohistochemistry for eNOS and cyclic GMP measurements and vasomotor studies were performed. Transgene expression was found to localize to the endothelium and adventitia. cGMP levels were significantly greater in AdeNOS compared to AdβGal transduced rings. Acetylcholine mediated relaxation was significantly impaired in cholesterol fed rabbits and was markedly improved by overexpression of eNOS. These results suggest that reduced NO bioavailability observed in cholesterol-induced vascular dysfunction can be partially overcome by eNOS gene transfer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-271
Number of pages7
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume141
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

Keywords

  • Adenoviral vector
  • Gene transfer
  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Nitric oxide
  • Nitric oxide synthase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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