Everyday Impact of Cognitive Interventions in Mild Cognitive Impairment: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Melanie J. Chandler, A. C. Parks, M. Marsiske, L. J. Rotblatt, G. E. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive interventions in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) seek to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in the condition. Cognitive interventions may or may not generalize beyond cognitive outcomes to everyday life. This systematic review and meta-analysis sought to assess the effect of cognitive interventions compared to a control group in MCI on generalizability outcome measures [activities of daily living (ADLs), mood, quality of life (QOL), and metacognition] rather than cognitive outcomes alone. PRISMA guidelines were followed. MEDLINE and PsychInfo were utilized as data sources to locate references related to cognitive interventions in individuals with MCI. The cognitive intervention study was required to have a control or alternative treatment comparison group to be included. Thirty articles met criteria, including six computerized cognitive interventions, 14 therapist-based interventions, and 10 multimodal (i.e., cognitive intervention plus an additional intervention) studies. Small, but significant overall median effects were seen for ADLs (d = 0.23), mood (d = 0.16), and metacognitive outcomes (d = 0.30), but not for QOL (d = 0.10). Computerized studies appeared to benefit mood (depression, anxiety, and apathy) compared to controls, while therapist-based interventions and multimodal interventions had more impact on ADLs and metacognitive outcomes than control conditions. The results are encouraging that cognitive interventions in MCI may impact everyday life, but considerably more research is needed. The current review and meta-analysis is limited by our use of only PsychInfo and MEDLINE databases, our inability to read full text non-English articles, and our reliance on only published data to complete effect sizes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-251
Number of pages27
JournalNeuropsychology Review
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Meta-Analysis
Activities of Daily Living
MEDLINE
Quality of Life
Apathy
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Information Storage and Retrieval
Anxiety
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Guidelines
Depression
Control Groups
Cognitive Dysfunction
Research
Metacognition
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Activities of daily living
  • Cognitive intervention
  • Mild Cognitive Impairment
  • Quality of life; systematic review; meta-analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Everyday Impact of Cognitive Interventions in Mild Cognitive Impairment : a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. / Chandler, Melanie J.; Parks, A. C.; Marsiske, M.; Rotblatt, L. J.; Smith, G. E.

In: Neuropsychology Review, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 225-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Chandler, Melanie J. ; Parks, A. C. ; Marsiske, M. ; Rotblatt, L. J. ; Smith, G. E. / Everyday Impact of Cognitive Interventions in Mild Cognitive Impairment : a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. In: Neuropsychology Review. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 225-251.
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