Evaluation of the association of prostate cancer-specific anxiety with sexual function, depression and cancer aggressiveness in men 1 year following surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer

Andrea M. Tavlarides, Steven C. Ames, Nancy N. Diehl, Richard W Joseph, Erik P Castle, David D. Thiel, Gregory A. Broderick, Alexander Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Cancer-specific anxiety (CSA) can affect treatment decisions and is common in men following surgery for prostate cancer (PCa). We hypothesized that CSA is also associated with factors affecting quality of life. Herein, we examine the association of CSA with psychosocial factors and PCa aggressiveness in a cohort of men 1 year after prostatectomy for localized PCa. Methods From our prospective PCa Registry, we identified 365 men who underwent prostatectomy for localized PCa who completed the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite at 1-year follow-up. We evaluated the association of scores on the MAX-PC with demographics, clinicopathologic features, sexual function, and depression scores using Wilcoxon Rank Sum and Kendall's tau correlation tests. Results Higher scores on the MAX-PC (i.e., higher anxiety) are associated with younger age (p < 0.01) and non-Caucasian race (p < 0.01). Men with higher MAX-PC scores also reported poor sexual satisfaction/function (p < 0.01) and increasing depressive symptoms (p < 0.01). Finally, although higher anxiety is associated with several pathologic features of aggressiveness (stage, positive margins, PSA at 1 year; all p-values < 0.01), we noted several men with clinically indolent disease who reported significant anxiety. Conclusions Our data suggest that higher levels of CSA are associated with poor sexual function and increased depressive symptoms 1 year after prostatectomy. Moreover, we noted demographic and pathologic features associated with higher CSA as well. If confirmed, our data support development of models to predict men at high risk of CSA following PCa surgery and targeted referral for additional counseling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1328-1335
Number of pages8
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
Anxiety
Depression
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Prostatectomy
Demography
Orgasm
Registries
Counseling
Referral and Consultation
Quality of Life
Psychology

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • oncology
  • prostate cancer
  • quality of life
  • surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Evaluation of the association of prostate cancer-specific anxiety with sexual function, depression and cancer aggressiveness in men 1 year following surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. / Tavlarides, Andrea M.; Ames, Steven C.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Joseph, Richard W; Castle, Erik P; Thiel, David D.; Broderick, Gregory A.; Parker, Alexander.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 22, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 1328-1335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Evaluation of the association of prostate cancer-specific anxiety with sexual function, depression and cancer aggressiveness in men 1 year following surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer",
abstract = "Background Cancer-specific anxiety (CSA) can affect treatment decisions and is common in men following surgery for prostate cancer (PCa). We hypothesized that CSA is also associated with factors affecting quality of life. Herein, we examine the association of CSA with psychosocial factors and PCa aggressiveness in a cohort of men 1 year after prostatectomy for localized PCa. Methods From our prospective PCa Registry, we identified 365 men who underwent prostatectomy for localized PCa who completed the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite at 1-year follow-up. We evaluated the association of scores on the MAX-PC with demographics, clinicopathologic features, sexual function, and depression scores using Wilcoxon Rank Sum and Kendall's tau correlation tests. Results Higher scores on the MAX-PC (i.e., higher anxiety) are associated with younger age (p < 0.01) and non-Caucasian race (p < 0.01). Men with higher MAX-PC scores also reported poor sexual satisfaction/function (p < 0.01) and increasing depressive symptoms (p < 0.01). Finally, although higher anxiety is associated with several pathologic features of aggressiveness (stage, positive margins, PSA at 1 year; all p-values < 0.01), we noted several men with clinically indolent disease who reported significant anxiety. Conclusions Our data suggest that higher levels of CSA are associated with poor sexual function and increased depressive symptoms 1 year after prostatectomy. Moreover, we noted demographic and pathologic features associated with higher CSA as well. If confirmed, our data support development of models to predict men at high risk of CSA following PCa surgery and targeted referral for additional counseling.",
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AU - Diehl, Nancy N.

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AU - Castle, Erik P

AU - Thiel, David D.

AU - Broderick, Gregory A.

AU - Parker, Alexander

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N2 - Background Cancer-specific anxiety (CSA) can affect treatment decisions and is common in men following surgery for prostate cancer (PCa). We hypothesized that CSA is also associated with factors affecting quality of life. Herein, we examine the association of CSA with psychosocial factors and PCa aggressiveness in a cohort of men 1 year after prostatectomy for localized PCa. Methods From our prospective PCa Registry, we identified 365 men who underwent prostatectomy for localized PCa who completed the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite at 1-year follow-up. We evaluated the association of scores on the MAX-PC with demographics, clinicopathologic features, sexual function, and depression scores using Wilcoxon Rank Sum and Kendall's tau correlation tests. Results Higher scores on the MAX-PC (i.e., higher anxiety) are associated with younger age (p < 0.01) and non-Caucasian race (p < 0.01). Men with higher MAX-PC scores also reported poor sexual satisfaction/function (p < 0.01) and increasing depressive symptoms (p < 0.01). Finally, although higher anxiety is associated with several pathologic features of aggressiveness (stage, positive margins, PSA at 1 year; all p-values < 0.01), we noted several men with clinically indolent disease who reported significant anxiety. Conclusions Our data suggest that higher levels of CSA are associated with poor sexual function and increased depressive symptoms 1 year after prostatectomy. Moreover, we noted demographic and pathologic features associated with higher CSA as well. If confirmed, our data support development of models to predict men at high risk of CSA following PCa surgery and targeted referral for additional counseling.

AB - Background Cancer-specific anxiety (CSA) can affect treatment decisions and is common in men following surgery for prostate cancer (PCa). We hypothesized that CSA is also associated with factors affecting quality of life. Herein, we examine the association of CSA with psychosocial factors and PCa aggressiveness in a cohort of men 1 year after prostatectomy for localized PCa. Methods From our prospective PCa Registry, we identified 365 men who underwent prostatectomy for localized PCa who completed the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite at 1-year follow-up. We evaluated the association of scores on the MAX-PC with demographics, clinicopathologic features, sexual function, and depression scores using Wilcoxon Rank Sum and Kendall's tau correlation tests. Results Higher scores on the MAX-PC (i.e., higher anxiety) are associated with younger age (p < 0.01) and non-Caucasian race (p < 0.01). Men with higher MAX-PC scores also reported poor sexual satisfaction/function (p < 0.01) and increasing depressive symptoms (p < 0.01). Finally, although higher anxiety is associated with several pathologic features of aggressiveness (stage, positive margins, PSA at 1 year; all p-values < 0.01), we noted several men with clinically indolent disease who reported significant anxiety. Conclusions Our data suggest that higher levels of CSA are associated with poor sexual function and increased depressive symptoms 1 year after prostatectomy. Moreover, we noted demographic and pathologic features associated with higher CSA as well. If confirmed, our data support development of models to predict men at high risk of CSA following PCa surgery and targeted referral for additional counseling.

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