Evaluation of pulmonary resistance and maximal expiratory flow measurements during exercise in humans

Kenneth C. Beck, Robert E. Hyatt, Panagiotis Mpougas, Paul D. Scanlon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

To evaluate methods used to document changes in airway function during and after exercise, we studied nine subjects with exercise-induced asthma and five subjects without asthma. Airway function was assessed from measurements of pulmonary resistance (RL) and forced expiratory vital capacity maneuvers. In the asthmatic subjects, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) fell 24 ± 14% and RL, increased 176 ± 153% after exercise, whereas normal subjects experienced no change in airway function (RL -3 ± 8% and FEV1 -4 ± 5%). During exercise, there was a tendency for FEV1 to increase in the asthmatic subjects but not in the normal subjects. RL, however, showed a slight increase during exercise in both groups. Changes in lung volumes encountered during exercise were small and had no consistent effect on RL. The small increases in RL during exercise could be explained by the nonlinearity of the pressure-flow relationship and the increased tidal breathing flows associated with exercise. In the asthmatic subjects, a deep inspiration (DI) caused a small, significant, transient decrease in RL 15 min after exercise. There was no change in RL in response to DI during exercise in either asthmatic or nonasthmatic subjects. When percent changes in RL and FEV1 during and after exercise were compared, there was close agreement between the two measurements of change in airway function. In the groups of normal and mildly asthmatic subjects, we conclude that changes in lung volume and Dis had no influence on RL during exercise. Increases in tidal breathing flows had only minor influence on measurements of RL during exercise. Furthermore, changes in RL and in FEV1 produce equivalent indexes of the variations in airway function during and after exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1388-1395
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1999

Keywords

  • Esophageal manometry
  • Forced vital capacity
  • Pulmonary function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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