Evaluation of patient tolerance and small-bowel distention with a new small-bowel distending agent for enterography

Amy B. Kolbe, Joel Garland Fletcher, Adam T. Froemming, Shannon P. Sheedy, Chi Wan Koo, Krishna Pundi, David H. Bruining, Jeanne Tung, William S. Harmsen, John M. Barlow, Jeff L. Fidler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to compare a flavored beverage containing a thickening agent for enterography with a low-Hounsfield-value barium suspension for side effects, taste, subjects' willingness to repeat the drinking protocol, and small-bowel distention. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. The following five drinking protocols were administered to 10 volunteers: 1000 mL of flavored beverage followed by 350 mL of water, 1500 mL of flavored beverage, 900 mL of low-Hounsfield-value barium suspension followed by 450 mL of water, 1350 mL of low-Hounsfield-value barium suspension followed by 150 mL of water, and 1500 mL of water. MR images were obtained 50 and 60 minutes after initiation of drinking. Subjects completed a questionnaire evaluating the side effects, the taste of the drink, and their willingness to repeat the drinking protocol. Reviewers assigned scores evaluating smallbowel distention and ranked the examinations in order of preference. RESULTS. There was no significant difference in nausea or vomiting among the protocols (p = 0.20 and 0.42, respectively), but larger volumes of flavored beverage and low- Hounsfield-value barium suspension resulted in more cramping and diarrhea (p = 0.001 and 0.002, respectively). The taste of the low-Hounsfield-value barium suspension was rated the worst (p <0.0001). The subjects' willingness to repeat the drinking protocol was highest for the 1000 mL of flavored beverage or water alone (p <0.05). There were no significant differences in subjective small-bowel distention except that water was rated the worst by two of the three readers (p <0.02). There was no significant difference in the diameter of the most distended small bowel for any segment or reader (p > 0.23). CONCLUSION. A flavored beverage containing a thickening agent has a similar side effect profile and results in equivalent small-bowel distention compared with a low-Hounsfieldvalue barium suspension, but subjects rate taste and their willingness to repeat the drinking protocol higher for this new agent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)994-1002
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume206
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

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Barium
Beverages
Suspensions
Drinking
Water
Nausea
Vomiting
Volunteers
Diarrhea

Keywords

  • Distention
  • Enterography
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Oral contrast material
  • Small bowel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Evaluation of patient tolerance and small-bowel distention with a new small-bowel distending agent for enterography. / Kolbe, Amy B.; Fletcher, Joel Garland; Froemming, Adam T.; Sheedy, Shannon P.; Koo, Chi Wan; Pundi, Krishna; Bruining, David H.; Tung, Jeanne; Harmsen, William S.; Barlow, John M.; Fidler, Jeff L.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 206, No. 5, 01.05.2016, p. 994-1002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kolbe, AB, Fletcher, JG, Froemming, AT, Sheedy, SP, Koo, CW, Pundi, K, Bruining, DH, Tung, J, Harmsen, WS, Barlow, JM & Fidler, JL 2016, 'Evaluation of patient tolerance and small-bowel distention with a new small-bowel distending agent for enterography', American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 206, no. 5, pp. 994-1002. https://doi.org/10.2214/AJR.15.15260
Kolbe, Amy B. ; Fletcher, Joel Garland ; Froemming, Adam T. ; Sheedy, Shannon P. ; Koo, Chi Wan ; Pundi, Krishna ; Bruining, David H. ; Tung, Jeanne ; Harmsen, William S. ; Barlow, John M. ; Fidler, Jeff L. / Evaluation of patient tolerance and small-bowel distention with a new small-bowel distending agent for enterography. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2016 ; Vol. 206, No. 5. pp. 994-1002.
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AU - Koo, Chi Wan

AU - Pundi, Krishna

AU - Bruining, David H.

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