Evaluating acutely injured patients for internal derangement of the knee

Michael Grover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although historical findings have some value in diagnosing internal derangement of the knee, a thorough physical examination can often rule out fracture and ligamentous and meniscal injuries. The Ottawa Knee Rule can help physicians determine which patients require radiography. Positive physical examination tests and findings of acute effusion suggest internal derangement. An abnormal McMurray or Thessaly test strongly suggests meniscal injury, whereas a normal Thessaly test may rule out meniscal injury. Absence of evidence of joint effusion significantly decreases the probability of internal derangement. Magnetic resonance imaging should be reserved for ruling out internal derangement in patients with suggestive historical and physical examination findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-252
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume85
Issue number3
StatePublished - Feb 2012

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Physical Examination
Knee
Wounds and Injuries
Radiography
Joints
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Evaluating acutely injured patients for internal derangement of the knee. / Grover, Michael.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 85, No. 3, 02.2012, p. 247-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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