Etiology and prevalence of severe persistent upper gastrointestinal bleeding

David Fleischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

148 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A prospective study was undertaken to establish the etiology and prevalence of episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding which are severe and persistent. During a 12-mo study period, 175 patients had one or more episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Thirty-six (20.6%) of the 175 patients had bleeding that was classified as severe and persistent. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding that occurred more than 24 h after admission was more apt to persist than bleeding that was a presenting complaint (32.4% vs. 12.8%, p < 0.001). Bleeding due to esophageal varices was the single most common cause. Although the majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episodes are self-limited, about one-fifth are not. Studies to evaluate the many new therapeutic modalities for upper gastrointestinal bleeding should attempt to exclude patients whose bleeding will abate spontaneously.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)538-543
Number of pages6
JournalGastroenterology
Volume84
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Hemorrhage
Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Etiology and prevalence of severe persistent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. / Fleischer, David.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 84, No. 3, 1983, p. 538-543.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fleischer, David. / Etiology and prevalence of severe persistent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. In: Gastroenterology. 1983 ; Vol. 84, No. 3. pp. 538-543.
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