Etiologic heterogeneity in endometrial cancer: Evidence from a Gynecologic Oncology Group trial

Louise A. Brinton, Ashley S. Felix, D. Scott McMeekin, William T. Creasman, Mark E. Sherman, David Mutch, David E. Cohn, Joan L. Walker, Richard G. Moore, Levi S. Downs, Robert A. Soslow, Richard Zaino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: Although the epidemiology of typical endometrial carcinomas (grades 1-2 endometrioid or Type I) is well established, less is known regarding higher grade endometrioid or non-endometrioid carcinomas (Type II). Within a large Gynecologic Oncology Group trial (GOG-210), which included central pathology review, we investigated the etiologic heterogeneity of endometrial cancers by comparing risk factors for different histologic categories. Methods: Based on epidemiologic questionnaire data, risk factor associations, expressed as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were estimated comparing grade 3 endometrioid and Type II cancers (including histologic subtypes) to grades 1-2 endometrioid cancers. Results: Compared with 2244 grades 1-2 endometrioid cancers, women with Type II cancers (321 serous, 141 carcinosarcomas, 77 clear cell, 42 mixed epithelial with serous or clear cell components) were older; more often non-white, multiparous, current smokers; and less often obese. Risk factors for grade 3 endometrioid carcinomas (n = 354) were generally similar to those identified for Type II cancers, although patients with grade 3 endometrioid tumors more often had histories of breast cancer without tamoxifen exposure while those with Type II tumors were more frequently treated with tamoxifen. Patients with serous cancers and carcinosarcomas more frequently had breast cancer histories with tamoxifen treatment compared to patients with other tumors. Conclusions: Risk factors for aggressive endometrial cancers, including grade 3 endometrioid and non-endometrioid tumors, appear to differ from lower grade endometrioid carcinomas. Our findings support etiologic differences between Type I and II endometrial cancers as well as additional heterogeneity within Type II cancers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-284
Number of pages8
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume129
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

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Endometrial Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Tamoxifen
Endometrioid Carcinoma
Carcinosarcoma
Breast Neoplasms
Cellular Structures
Epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Pathology
Carcinoma

Keywords

  • Carcinosarcoma
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Epidemiology
  • Etiology
  • Serous endometrial cancer
  • Type II endometrial cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Brinton, L. A., Felix, A. S., McMeekin, D. S., Creasman, W. T., Sherman, M. E., Mutch, D., ... Zaino, R. (2013). Etiologic heterogeneity in endometrial cancer: Evidence from a Gynecologic Oncology Group trial. Gynecologic Oncology, 129(2), 277-284. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.02.023

Etiologic heterogeneity in endometrial cancer : Evidence from a Gynecologic Oncology Group trial. / Brinton, Louise A.; Felix, Ashley S.; McMeekin, D. Scott; Creasman, William T.; Sherman, Mark E.; Mutch, David; Cohn, David E.; Walker, Joan L.; Moore, Richard G.; Downs, Levi S.; Soslow, Robert A.; Zaino, Richard.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 129, No. 2, 05.2013, p. 277-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brinton, LA, Felix, AS, McMeekin, DS, Creasman, WT, Sherman, ME, Mutch, D, Cohn, DE, Walker, JL, Moore, RG, Downs, LS, Soslow, RA & Zaino, R 2013, 'Etiologic heterogeneity in endometrial cancer: Evidence from a Gynecologic Oncology Group trial', Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 129, no. 2, pp. 277-284. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.02.023
Brinton, Louise A. ; Felix, Ashley S. ; McMeekin, D. Scott ; Creasman, William T. ; Sherman, Mark E. ; Mutch, David ; Cohn, David E. ; Walker, Joan L. ; Moore, Richard G. ; Downs, Levi S. ; Soslow, Robert A. ; Zaino, Richard. / Etiologic heterogeneity in endometrial cancer : Evidence from a Gynecologic Oncology Group trial. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 2013 ; Vol. 129, No. 2. pp. 277-284.
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abstract = "Objective: Although the epidemiology of typical endometrial carcinomas (grades 1-2 endometrioid or Type I) is well established, less is known regarding higher grade endometrioid or non-endometrioid carcinomas (Type II). Within a large Gynecologic Oncology Group trial (GOG-210), which included central pathology review, we investigated the etiologic heterogeneity of endometrial cancers by comparing risk factors for different histologic categories. Methods: Based on epidemiologic questionnaire data, risk factor associations, expressed as odds ratios (OR) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI), were estimated comparing grade 3 endometrioid and Type II cancers (including histologic subtypes) to grades 1-2 endometrioid cancers. Results: Compared with 2244 grades 1-2 endometrioid cancers, women with Type II cancers (321 serous, 141 carcinosarcomas, 77 clear cell, 42 mixed epithelial with serous or clear cell components) were older; more often non-white, multiparous, current smokers; and less often obese. Risk factors for grade 3 endometrioid carcinomas (n = 354) were generally similar to those identified for Type II cancers, although patients with grade 3 endometrioid tumors more often had histories of breast cancer without tamoxifen exposure while those with Type II tumors were more frequently treated with tamoxifen. Patients with serous cancers and carcinosarcomas more frequently had breast cancer histories with tamoxifen treatment compared to patients with other tumors. Conclusions: Risk factors for aggressive endometrial cancers, including grade 3 endometrioid and non-endometrioid tumors, appear to differ from lower grade endometrioid carcinomas. Our findings support etiologic differences between Type I and II endometrial cancers as well as additional heterogeneity within Type II cancers.",
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T2 - Evidence from a Gynecologic Oncology Group trial

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AU - Felix, Ashley S.

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AU - Sherman, Mark E.

AU - Mutch, David

AU - Cohn, David E.

AU - Walker, Joan L.

AU - Moore, Richard G.

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AU - Soslow, Robert A.

AU - Zaino, Richard

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N2 - Objective: Although the epidemiology of typical endometrial carcinomas (grades 1-2 endometrioid or Type I) is well established, less is known regarding higher grade endometrioid or non-endometrioid carcinomas (Type II). Within a large Gynecologic Oncology Group trial (GOG-210), which included central pathology review, we investigated the etiologic heterogeneity of endometrial cancers by comparing risk factors for different histologic categories. Methods: Based on epidemiologic questionnaire data, risk factor associations, expressed as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were estimated comparing grade 3 endometrioid and Type II cancers (including histologic subtypes) to grades 1-2 endometrioid cancers. Results: Compared with 2244 grades 1-2 endometrioid cancers, women with Type II cancers (321 serous, 141 carcinosarcomas, 77 clear cell, 42 mixed epithelial with serous or clear cell components) were older; more often non-white, multiparous, current smokers; and less often obese. Risk factors for grade 3 endometrioid carcinomas (n = 354) were generally similar to those identified for Type II cancers, although patients with grade 3 endometrioid tumors more often had histories of breast cancer without tamoxifen exposure while those with Type II tumors were more frequently treated with tamoxifen. Patients with serous cancers and carcinosarcomas more frequently had breast cancer histories with tamoxifen treatment compared to patients with other tumors. Conclusions: Risk factors for aggressive endometrial cancers, including grade 3 endometrioid and non-endometrioid tumors, appear to differ from lower grade endometrioid carcinomas. Our findings support etiologic differences between Type I and II endometrial cancers as well as additional heterogeneity within Type II cancers.

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KW - Epidemiology

KW - Etiology

KW - Serous endometrial cancer

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