Ethics and high-value care

Matthew DeCamp, Jon C Tilburt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-value care (HVC) is en vogue, but the ethics of physicians' roles in the growing number of HVC recommendations demands further attention. In this brief report, we argue that, from the standpoint of individual physicians' primary commitments and duties to individual patients, not all HVC is ethically equal. Our analysis suggests that the ethical case for HVC may be both stronger and weaker than is ordinarily supposed. In some cases, HVC is not merely a 'good thing to do' but is actually ethically obligatory. In others, it is merely permissible-or even ethically suspect. More importantly, we suggest further that understanding HVC as ethically 'obligatory, permissible, or suspect' has implications for the design and implementation of strategies that promote HVC. For example, it questions the use of adherence to certain HVC recommendations as a physician performance metric, which may already be occurring in some contexts. Properly construed, ethics does not threaten HVC but can instead help shape HVC in ways that preserve the fundamental values of the medical profession.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Medical Ethics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 26 2017

Fingerprint

Ethics
moral philosophy
Ethical Analysis
Physicians
Physician's Role
physician
profession
commitment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Ethics and high-value care. / DeCamp, Matthew; Tilburt, Jon C.

In: Journal of Medical Ethics, 26.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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