Estrogen as therapy for breast cancer

James N. Ingle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-dose estrogen was generally considered the endocrine therapy of choice for postmenopausal women with breast cancer prior to the introduction of tamoxifen. Subsequently, the use of estrogen was largely abandoned. Recent clinical trial data have shown clinically meaningful efficacy for high-dose estrogen even in patients with extensive prior endocrine therapy. Preclinical research has demonstrated that the estrogen dose-response curve for breast cancer cells can be shifted by modification of the estrogen environment. Clinical and laboratory data together provide the basis for developing testable hypotheses of management strategies, with the potential of increasing the value of endocrine therapy in women with breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-136
Number of pages4
JournalBreast Cancer Research
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Estrogens
Breast Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Tamoxifen
Clinical Trials
Research

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Dose-response
  • Endocrine therapy
  • Estrogen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Estrogen as therapy for breast cancer. / Ingle, James N.

In: Breast Cancer Research, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2002, p. 133-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ingle, James N. / Estrogen as therapy for breast cancer. In: Breast Cancer Research. 2002 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 133-136.
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