Estimation of mechanical properties of arteries and soft tubes using shear wave speeds

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arterial elasticity has gained importance in the past few decades as a predictor of cardiovascular diseases and mortality [1]. We propose a noninvasive technique using ultrasound radiation force and measurement of shear wave speed to calculate the mechanical properties of soft tubes and arteries noninvasively. To validate the technique we made three urethane tubes with different Young's moduli, tested the tubes and used the measured tube wall's shear wave speed and the modified Moens-Korteweg equation to estimate the Young's moduli. Samples of the same material were mechanically tested to compare the results from our technique. Excised carotid arteries from a pig were used to study the applicability of our method in soft tissues. Both the tubes and the arteries were embedded in gelatin to simulate the soft tissue surrounding the arteries, and pressurized using a column of water. The results from the tubes were in very good agreement with the mechanical testing, and the shear wave speed did not seem to change very much with change in transmural pressure. On the other hand, the excised arteries showed an increase in shear wave velocity with pressure and an increase in the Young's modulus. The technique we present here showed to be in good agreement with mechanical testing which gives us confidence to think that it can be applied in the study of arteries in vivo. Efforts towards implementing this technique in a clinical scanner are underway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event2009 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2009 - Rome, Italy
Duration: Sep 20 2009Sep 23 2009

Other

Other2009 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2009
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period9/20/099/23/09

Fingerprint

arteries
S waves
mechanical properties
tubes
modulus of elasticity
urethanes
swine
mortality
gelatins
scanners
confidence
elastic properties
radiation
estimates
predictions
water

Keywords

  • Arterial elasticity
  • Mechanical testing
  • Shear wave
  • Young's modulus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Estimation of mechanical properties of arteries and soft tubes using shear wave speeds. / Bernal, Miguel; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F.

Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium. 2009. 5441409.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bernal, M, Urban, MW & Greenleaf, JF 2009, Estimation of mechanical properties of arteries and soft tubes using shear wave speeds. in Proceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium., 5441409, 2009 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2009, Rome, Italy, 9/20/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2009.5441409
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