Estimating long-term effectiveness of lung cancer screening in the Mayo CT screening study

Pamela M. McMahon, Yin Kong Chung, Bruce E. Johnson, Milton C. Weinstein, Jane C. Weeks, Karen M. Kuntz, Jo Anne O Shepard, Stephen J. Swensen, G. Scott Gazelle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: To use individual-level data provided from the single-arm study of helical computed tomographic (CT) screening at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minn) to estimate the longterm effectiveness of screening in Mayo study participants and to compare estimates from an existing lung cancer simulation model with estimates from a different modeling approach that used the same data. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by institutional review boards and was HIPAA compliant. Deidentified individual-level data from participants (1520 current or former smokers aged 50-85 years) in the Mayo Clinic helical CT screening study were used to populate the Lung Cancer Policy Model, a comprehensive microsimulation model of lung cancer development, screening findings, treatment results, and long-term outcomes. The model predicted diagnosed cases of lung cancer and deaths per simulated study arm (five annual screening examinations vs no screening). Main outcome measures were predicted changes in lung cancer-specific and all-cause mortality as functions of follow-up time after simulated enrollment and randomization. Results: At 6-year follow-up, the screening arm had an estimated 37% relative increase in lung cancer detection, compared with the control arm. At 15-year follow-up, five annual screening examinations yielded a 9% relative increase in lung cancer detection. The relative reduction in cumulative lung cancer-specific mortality from five annual screening examinations was 28% at 6-year follow-up (15% at 15 years). The relative reduction in cumulative all-cause mortality from five annual screening examinations was 4% at 6-year follow-up (2% at 15 years). Conclusion: Screening may reduce lung cancer-specific mortality but may offer a smaller reduction in overall mortality because of increased competing mortality risks associated with smoking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-287
Number of pages10
JournalRadiology
Volume248
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Early Detection of Cancer
Lung Neoplasms
Mortality
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
Research Ethics Committees
Random Allocation
Smoking
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

McMahon, P. M., Chung, Y. K., Johnson, B. E., Weinstein, M. C., Weeks, J. C., Kuntz, K. M., ... Gazelle, G. S. (2008). Estimating long-term effectiveness of lung cancer screening in the Mayo CT screening study. Radiology, 248(1), 278-287. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2481071446

Estimating long-term effectiveness of lung cancer screening in the Mayo CT screening study. / McMahon, Pamela M.; Chung, Yin Kong; Johnson, Bruce E.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Weeks, Jane C.; Kuntz, Karen M.; Shepard, Jo Anne O; Swensen, Stephen J.; Gazelle, G. Scott.

In: Radiology, Vol. 248, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 278-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McMahon, PM, Chung, YK, Johnson, BE, Weinstein, MC, Weeks, JC, Kuntz, KM, Shepard, JAO, Swensen, SJ & Gazelle, GS 2008, 'Estimating long-term effectiveness of lung cancer screening in the Mayo CT screening study', Radiology, vol. 248, no. 1, pp. 278-287. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2481071446
McMahon PM, Chung YK, Johnson BE, Weinstein MC, Weeks JC, Kuntz KM et al. Estimating long-term effectiveness of lung cancer screening in the Mayo CT screening study. Radiology. 2008 Jul;248(1):278-287. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2481071446
McMahon, Pamela M. ; Chung, Yin Kong ; Johnson, Bruce E. ; Weinstein, Milton C. ; Weeks, Jane C. ; Kuntz, Karen M. ; Shepard, Jo Anne O ; Swensen, Stephen J. ; Gazelle, G. Scott. / Estimating long-term effectiveness of lung cancer screening in the Mayo CT screening study. In: Radiology. 2008 ; Vol. 248, No. 1. pp. 278-287.
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