ERAS protocol validation in a propensity-matched cohort of patients undergoing colorectal surgery

Riccardo Lemini, Aaron Spaulding, James M Naessens, Zhuo Li, Amit Merchea, Juliana Crook, David Larson, Dorin T. Colibaseanu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) provides many benefits. However, important knowledge gaps with respect to specific components of enhanced recovery after surgery remain because of limited validation data. The aim of the study was to validate a mature ERAS protocol at a different hospital and in a similar population of patients. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery from 2009 through 2016. Patients enrolled in ERAS are compared with those undergoing the standard of care. Patient demographic characteristics, length of stay, pain scores, and perioperative morbidity are described. Results: Patients (1396) were propensity matched into two equal groups (ERAS vs non-ERAS). No significant difference was observed for age, Charlson Comorbidity Index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, body mass index, sex, operative approach, and surgery duration. Median length of stay in ERAS and non-ERAS groups was 3 and 5 days (P <.001). Mean pain scores were lower in the ERAS group, measured at discharge from the postanesthesia unit (P <.001), on postoperative day 1 (P =.002) and postoperative day 2 (P =.02) but were identical on discharge. Conclusions: This ERAS protocol was validated in a similar patient population but at a different hospital. ERAS implementation was associated with an improved length of stay and pain scores similar to the original study. Different than most retrospective studies, propensity score matching ensured that groups were evenly matched. To our knowledge, this study is the only ERAS validation study in a propensity-matched cohort of patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Colorectal surgery
  • Pain management
  • Patient discharge
  • Patient readmission
  • Propensity score

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this