Epigenetic Landscapes Explain Partially Reprogrammed Cells and Identify Key Reprogramming Genes

Alex H. Lang, Hu Li, James J. Collins, Pankaj Mehta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A common metaphor for describing development is a rugged “epigenetic landscape” where cell fates are represented as attracting valleys resulting from a complex regulatory network. Here, we introduce a framework for explicitly constructing epigenetic landscapes that combines genomic data with techniques from spin-glass physics. Each cell fate is a dynamic attractor, yet cells can change fate in response to external signals. Our model suggests that partially reprogrammed cells are a natural consequence of high-dimensional landscapes, and predicts that partially reprogrammed cells should be hybrids that co-express genes from multiple cell fates. We verify this prediction by reanalyzing existing datasets. Our model reproduces known reprogramming protocols and identifies candidate transcription factors for reprogramming to novel cell fates, suggesting epigenetic landscapes are a powerful paradigm for understanding cellular identity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1003734
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 14 2014

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Epigenomics
epigenetics
Genes
Gene
Transcription factors
Spin glass
gene
Cell
genes
Physics
cells
genomics
physics
glass
Metaphor
Regulatory Networks
valley
Spin Glass
Transcription Factor
Complex Networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Ecology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Epigenetic Landscapes Explain Partially Reprogrammed Cells and Identify Key Reprogramming Genes. / Lang, Alex H.; Li, Hu; Collins, James J.; Mehta, Pankaj.

In: PLoS Computational Biology, Vol. 10, No. 8, e1003734, 14.08.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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