Epidemiology and outcomes of pediatric multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

R. Scott Watson, Sheri S. Crow, Mary E. Hartman, Jacques Lacroix, Folafoluwa O. Odetola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To summarize the epidemiology and outcomes of children with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome as part of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development multiple organ dysfunction syndrome workshop (March 26-27, 2015). Data Sources: Literature review, research data, and expert opinion. Study Selection: Not applicable. Data Extraction: Moderated by an experienced expert from the field, issues relevant to the epidemiology and outcomes of children with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome were presented, discussed, and debated with a focus on identifying knowledge gaps and research priorities. Data Synthesis: Summary of presentations and discussion supported and supplemented by the relevant literature. Conclusions: A full understanding the epidemiology and outcome of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in children is limited by inconsistent definitions and populations studied. Nonetheless, pediatric multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is common among PICU patients, occurring in up to 57% depending on the population studied; sepsis remains its leading cause. Pediatric multiple organ dysfunction syndrome leads to considerable short-term morbidity and mortality. Long-term outcomes of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in children have not been well studied; however, studies of adults and children with other critical illnesses suggest that the risk of long-term adverse sequelae is high. Characterization of the long-term outcomes of pediatric multiple organ dysfunction syndrome is crucial to identify opportunities for improved treatment and recovery strategies that will improve the quality of life of critically ill children and their families. The workshop identified important knowledge gaps and research priorities intended to promote the development of standard definitions and the identification of modifiable factors related to its occurrence and outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S4-S16
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Multiple Organ Failure
Epidemiology
Pediatrics
Critical Illness
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.)
Research
Education
Information Storage and Retrieval
Expert Testimony
Population
Sepsis
Quality of Life
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Healthcare outcomes
  • Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome
  • Pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Watson, R. S., Crow, S. S., Hartman, M. E., Lacroix, J., & Odetola, F. O. (2017). Epidemiology and outcomes of pediatric multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, 18(3), S4-S16. https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001047

Epidemiology and outcomes of pediatric multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. / Watson, R. Scott; Crow, Sheri S.; Hartman, Mary E.; Lacroix, Jacques; Odetola, Folafoluwa O.

In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2017, p. S4-S16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watson, RS, Crow, SS, Hartman, ME, Lacroix, J & Odetola, FO 2017, 'Epidemiology and outcomes of pediatric multiple organ dysfunction syndrome', Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. S4-S16. https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001047
Watson, R. Scott ; Crow, Sheri S. ; Hartman, Mary E. ; Lacroix, Jacques ; Odetola, Folafoluwa O. / Epidemiology and outcomes of pediatric multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. S4-S16.
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