Epidemiological study of Anti-HPV16/18 seropositivity and subsequent risk of HPV16 and -18 infections

Mahboobeh Safaeian, Carolina Porras, Mark Schiffman, Ana Cecilia Rodriguez, Sholom Wacholder, Paula Gonzalez, Wim Quint, Leen Jan Van Doorn, Mark E. Sherman, Valérie Xhenseval, Rolando Herrero, Allan Hildesheim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BackgroundInfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 or HPV18 elicits an antibody response, but whether the elicited antibodies protect women against subsequent infection by a homologous HPV type compared with seronegative women is unknown.MethodsStudy participants were women aged 18-25 years at enrollment in the control group of the ongoing National Cancer Institute-sponsored, community-based, randomized HPV16/18 Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. At enrollment, 2813 participants were negative for cervical HPV16 DNA and 2950 for HPV18 DNA. Women were interviewed regarding sociodemographic data and medical and health history. Medical and pelvic examinations were conducted for all consenting sexually experienced women. Serum samples taken at enrollment were tested for total HPV16/18 antibodies with a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and cervical specimens were tested for type-specific HPV DNA over 4 years of follow-up. Using Poisson regression, we compared rate ratios of newly detected cervical HPV16 or HPV18 infection among homologous HPV-seropositive and HPV-seronegative women, adjusting for age, education, marital status, lifetime number of sexual partners, and smoking.ResultsThere were 231 newly detected HPV16 infections during 5886 person-years among HPV16-seronegative women compared with 12 newly detected HPV16 infections during 581 person-years among HPV16-seropositive women with the highest HPV16 sero-levels. There were 136 newly detected HPV18 infections during 6352 person-years among HPV18-seronegative women compared with six new infections detected during 675 person-years among HPV18 seropositives with the highest sero-levels. After controlling for risk factors associated with newly detected HPV infection, having high HPV16 antibody titer at enrollment was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 infection (women in the highest tertile of HPV16 antibody titers, adjusted rate ratio = 0.50, 95% confidence interval = 0.26 to 0.86 vs HPV16-seronegative women). Similarly, having high HPV18 antibody titer at enrollment was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent HPV18 infection (women in the highest tertile of HPV18 antibody titers, adjusted rate ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.14 to 0.76 vs HPV18-seronegative women).ConclusionIn this study population, having high antibody levels against HPV16 and HPV18 following natural infection was associated with reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1653-1662
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume102
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 3 2010

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Epidemiologic Studies
Infection
Antibodies
DNA
Confidence Intervals
Costa Rica
Gynecological Examination
Papillomavirus Infections
Human papillomavirus 16
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Sexual Partners
Marital Status
Antibody Formation
Vaccines
Smoking
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Education
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Safaeian, M., Porras, C., Schiffman, M., Rodriguez, A. C., Wacholder, S., Gonzalez, P., ... Hildesheim, A. (2010). Epidemiological study of Anti-HPV16/18 seropositivity and subsequent risk of HPV16 and -18 infections. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 102(21), 1653-1662. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djq384

Epidemiological study of Anti-HPV16/18 seropositivity and subsequent risk of HPV16 and -18 infections. / Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Quint, Wim; Van Doorn, Leen Jan; Sherman, Mark E.; Xhenseval, Valérie; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 102, No. 21, 03.11.2010, p. 1653-1662.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Safaeian, M, Porras, C, Schiffman, M, Rodriguez, AC, Wacholder, S, Gonzalez, P, Quint, W, Van Doorn, LJ, Sherman, ME, Xhenseval, V, Herrero, R & Hildesheim, A 2010, 'Epidemiological study of Anti-HPV16/18 seropositivity and subsequent risk of HPV16 and -18 infections', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 102, no. 21, pp. 1653-1662. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djq384
Safaeian, Mahboobeh ; Porras, Carolina ; Schiffman, Mark ; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia ; Wacholder, Sholom ; Gonzalez, Paula ; Quint, Wim ; Van Doorn, Leen Jan ; Sherman, Mark E. ; Xhenseval, Valérie ; Herrero, Rolando ; Hildesheim, Allan. / Epidemiological study of Anti-HPV16/18 seropositivity and subsequent risk of HPV16 and -18 infections. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2010 ; Vol. 102, No. 21. pp. 1653-1662.
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abstract = "BackgroundInfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 or HPV18 elicits an antibody response, but whether the elicited antibodies protect women against subsequent infection by a homologous HPV type compared with seronegative women is unknown.MethodsStudy participants were women aged 18-25 years at enrollment in the control group of the ongoing National Cancer Institute-sponsored, community-based, randomized HPV16/18 Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. At enrollment, 2813 participants were negative for cervical HPV16 DNA and 2950 for HPV18 DNA. Women were interviewed regarding sociodemographic data and medical and health history. Medical and pelvic examinations were conducted for all consenting sexually experienced women. Serum samples taken at enrollment were tested for total HPV16/18 antibodies with a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and cervical specimens were tested for type-specific HPV DNA over 4 years of follow-up. Using Poisson regression, we compared rate ratios of newly detected cervical HPV16 or HPV18 infection among homologous HPV-seropositive and HPV-seronegative women, adjusting for age, education, marital status, lifetime number of sexual partners, and smoking.ResultsThere were 231 newly detected HPV16 infections during 5886 person-years among HPV16-seronegative women compared with 12 newly detected HPV16 infections during 581 person-years among HPV16-seropositive women with the highest HPV16 sero-levels. There were 136 newly detected HPV18 infections during 6352 person-years among HPV18-seronegative women compared with six new infections detected during 675 person-years among HPV18 seropositives with the highest sero-levels. After controlling for risk factors associated with newly detected HPV infection, having high HPV16 antibody titer at enrollment was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 infection (women in the highest tertile of HPV16 antibody titers, adjusted rate ratio = 0.50, 95{\%} confidence interval = 0.26 to 0.86 vs HPV16-seronegative women). Similarly, having high HPV18 antibody titer at enrollment was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent HPV18 infection (women in the highest tertile of HPV18 antibody titers, adjusted rate ratio = 0.36, 95{\%} confidence interval = 0.14 to 0.76 vs HPV18-seronegative women).ConclusionIn this study population, having high antibody levels against HPV16 and HPV18 following natural infection was associated with reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 and HPV18 infections.",
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AU - Safaeian, Mahboobeh

AU - Porras, Carolina

AU - Schiffman, Mark

AU - Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia

AU - Wacholder, Sholom

AU - Gonzalez, Paula

AU - Quint, Wim

AU - Van Doorn, Leen Jan

AU - Sherman, Mark E.

AU - Xhenseval, Valérie

AU - Herrero, Rolando

AU - Hildesheim, Allan

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N2 - BackgroundInfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 or HPV18 elicits an antibody response, but whether the elicited antibodies protect women against subsequent infection by a homologous HPV type compared with seronegative women is unknown.MethodsStudy participants were women aged 18-25 years at enrollment in the control group of the ongoing National Cancer Institute-sponsored, community-based, randomized HPV16/18 Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. At enrollment, 2813 participants were negative for cervical HPV16 DNA and 2950 for HPV18 DNA. Women were interviewed regarding sociodemographic data and medical and health history. Medical and pelvic examinations were conducted for all consenting sexually experienced women. Serum samples taken at enrollment were tested for total HPV16/18 antibodies with a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and cervical specimens were tested for type-specific HPV DNA over 4 years of follow-up. Using Poisson regression, we compared rate ratios of newly detected cervical HPV16 or HPV18 infection among homologous HPV-seropositive and HPV-seronegative women, adjusting for age, education, marital status, lifetime number of sexual partners, and smoking.ResultsThere were 231 newly detected HPV16 infections during 5886 person-years among HPV16-seronegative women compared with 12 newly detected HPV16 infections during 581 person-years among HPV16-seropositive women with the highest HPV16 sero-levels. There were 136 newly detected HPV18 infections during 6352 person-years among HPV18-seronegative women compared with six new infections detected during 675 person-years among HPV18 seropositives with the highest sero-levels. After controlling for risk factors associated with newly detected HPV infection, having high HPV16 antibody titer at enrollment was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 infection (women in the highest tertile of HPV16 antibody titers, adjusted rate ratio = 0.50, 95% confidence interval = 0.26 to 0.86 vs HPV16-seronegative women). Similarly, having high HPV18 antibody titer at enrollment was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent HPV18 infection (women in the highest tertile of HPV18 antibody titers, adjusted rate ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.14 to 0.76 vs HPV18-seronegative women).ConclusionIn this study population, having high antibody levels against HPV16 and HPV18 following natural infection was associated with reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

AB - BackgroundInfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 or HPV18 elicits an antibody response, but whether the elicited antibodies protect women against subsequent infection by a homologous HPV type compared with seronegative women is unknown.MethodsStudy participants were women aged 18-25 years at enrollment in the control group of the ongoing National Cancer Institute-sponsored, community-based, randomized HPV16/18 Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. At enrollment, 2813 participants were negative for cervical HPV16 DNA and 2950 for HPV18 DNA. Women were interviewed regarding sociodemographic data and medical and health history. Medical and pelvic examinations were conducted for all consenting sexually experienced women. Serum samples taken at enrollment were tested for total HPV16/18 antibodies with a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and cervical specimens were tested for type-specific HPV DNA over 4 years of follow-up. Using Poisson regression, we compared rate ratios of newly detected cervical HPV16 or HPV18 infection among homologous HPV-seropositive and HPV-seronegative women, adjusting for age, education, marital status, lifetime number of sexual partners, and smoking.ResultsThere were 231 newly detected HPV16 infections during 5886 person-years among HPV16-seronegative women compared with 12 newly detected HPV16 infections during 581 person-years among HPV16-seropositive women with the highest HPV16 sero-levels. There were 136 newly detected HPV18 infections during 6352 person-years among HPV18-seronegative women compared with six new infections detected during 675 person-years among HPV18 seropositives with the highest sero-levels. After controlling for risk factors associated with newly detected HPV infection, having high HPV16 antibody titer at enrollment was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 infection (women in the highest tertile of HPV16 antibody titers, adjusted rate ratio = 0.50, 95% confidence interval = 0.26 to 0.86 vs HPV16-seronegative women). Similarly, having high HPV18 antibody titer at enrollment was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent HPV18 infection (women in the highest tertile of HPV18 antibody titers, adjusted rate ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.14 to 0.76 vs HPV18-seronegative women).ConclusionIn this study population, having high antibody levels against HPV16 and HPV18 following natural infection was associated with reduced risk of subsequent HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

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