Eosinophils increase neuron branching in human and murine skin and in vitro

Erin L. Foster, Eric L. Simpson, Lorna J. Fredrikson, James J. Lee, Nancy A Lee, Allison D. Fryer, David B. Jacoby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cutaneous nerves are increased in atopic dermatitis, and itch is a prominent symptom. We studied the functional interactions between eosinophils and nerves in human and mouse skin and in culture. We demonstrated that human atopic dermatitis skin has eosinophil granule proteins present in the same region as increased nerves. Transgenic mice in which interleukin-5 (IL-5) expression is driven by a keratin-14 (K14) promoter had many eosinophils in the epidermis, and the number of nerves was also significantly increased in the epidermis. In co-cultures, eosinophils dramatically increased branching of sensory neurons isolated from the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of mice. This effect did not occur in DRG neurons co-cultured with mast cells or with dead eosinophils. Physical contact of the eosinophils with the neurons was not required, and the effect was not blocked by an antibody to nerve growth factor. DRG neurons express eotaxin-1, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, which may be important in the recruitment, binding, and activation of eosinophils in the region of cutaneous nerves. These data indicate a pathophysiological role for eosinophils in cutaneous nerve growth in atopic dermatitis, and suggest they may present a therapeutic target in atopic dermatitis and other eosinophilic skin conditions with neuronal symptoms such as itch.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere22029
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

eosinophils
Eosinophils
skin (animal)
Neurons
branching
Skin
neurons
nerve tissue
Atopic Dermatitis
atopic dermatitis
mice
Spinal Ganglia
Eosinophil Granule Proteins
Chemokine CCL11
Keratin-14
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
epidermis (animal)
Interleukin-5
Epidermis
Nerve Growth Factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Foster, E. L., Simpson, E. L., Fredrikson, L. J., Lee, J. J., Lee, N. A., Fryer, A. D., & Jacoby, D. B. (2011). Eosinophils increase neuron branching in human and murine skin and in vitro. PLoS One, 6(7), [e22029]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0022029

Eosinophils increase neuron branching in human and murine skin and in vitro. / Foster, Erin L.; Simpson, Eric L.; Fredrikson, Lorna J.; Lee, James J.; Lee, Nancy A; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 7, e22029, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foster, EL, Simpson, EL, Fredrikson, LJ, Lee, JJ, Lee, NA, Fryer, AD & Jacoby, DB 2011, 'Eosinophils increase neuron branching in human and murine skin and in vitro', PLoS One, vol. 6, no. 7, e22029. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0022029
Foster, Erin L. ; Simpson, Eric L. ; Fredrikson, Lorna J. ; Lee, James J. ; Lee, Nancy A ; Fryer, Allison D. ; Jacoby, David B. / Eosinophils increase neuron branching in human and murine skin and in vitro. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 7.
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