Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: Using Presenting Findings to Predict Disease Course

Daniel Havlichek, Rok Seon Choung, Joseph A. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Studies on eosinophilic gastroenteritis have identified broad spectrums of disease. We aimed to characterize subtypes of disease and ascertain outcomes of each group. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study from a large tertiary medical center including 35 patients diagnosed with eosinophilic gastroenteritis from 2007 to 2018. We defined 2 groups of patients based on clinical and laboratory findings at presentation. Severe disease was defined as having weight loss at time of presentation, hypoalbuminemia at presentation, serosal disease involvement, or anemia at diagnosis. The remaining patients were labeled as mild disease group. We collected and compared demographic data, clinical features, laboratory findings, an allergy history, and disease course of both cohorts. RESULTS: Among 35 patients with eosinophilic gastroenteritis, 18 patients met the criteria for severe disease and 17 patients for mild disease. Of the patients with severe eosinophilic gastroenteritis, 6 (38%) had remission without chronic symptoms, whereas 10 (63%) had chronic symptoms requiring chronic medical therapy. Of the mild group, 12 patients (80%) had disease remission without chronic medications. An allergy history was more common in the severe disease group (83%) compared with the mild disease group (45%). Prednisone and open capsule budesonide were the most commonly used treatment medications in both groups. DISCUSSION: Patients with eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be characterized into 2 forms. Patients with weight loss at time of presentation, hypoalbuminemia at presentation, serosal disease involvement, or anemia at diagnosis were associated with a chronic disease course requiring chronic medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e00394
JournalClinical and translational gastroenterology
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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