Enzymatic sulfation of steroids: XII. The effect of streptozotocin on hepatic cortisol sulfation and on the individual hepatic glucocorticoid sulfotransferases in male rats

S. S. Singer, V. Martin, M. Federspiel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

A single, 75 mg per kg body weight, dose of streptozotocin elevated the hepatic glucorticoid (cortisol) sulfotransferase activity in intact male rats very extensively. The enzyme activity doubled within 10 to 11 days after administration of the diabetogenic drug. Maximum, 300-375%, increases of the sulfotransferase activity were obtained by 20 to 25 days after streptozotocin was given. These persisted for at least 33 to 38 days after its administration. The effect was shown to be due to the elevation of the concentrations of all three rat liver glucocorticoid sulfotransferases (STI, STII, and STIII). The relative amounts of these enzymes in experimental animals were 22.5 ± 6.1, 30.3 ± 12, and 46.2 ± 12%, respectively, 26 to 38 days after streptozotocin. The values obtained in untreated controls were 0, 10.1 ± 6.1, and 82.2 ± 12%. Repeated administration of insulin to streptozotocin-treated rats produced animals whose livers contained much less glucocorticoid sulfotransferase activity than livers from streptozotocin-treated rats which did not receive the hormone. This pointed out that insulin either prevented or reversed the effect of the drug on the sulfotransferases. The potential relationship between the glucocorticoid sulfotransferases, diabetes, and hypertension is discussed in the text.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-49
Number of pages5
JournalHormone and Metabolic Research
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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