Enterochromaffin cells and 5-HT signaling in the pathophysiology of disorders of gastrointestinal function

Michael D. Crowell, Michael A. Shetzline, Peter L. Moses, Gary M. Mawe, Nicholas J. Talley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disorders of gastrointestinal function are common and significantly reduce quality-of-life, as well as negatively impacting healthcare costs. Consequently, there is much interest in understanding the pathogenesis of these disorders. Increasing, albeit as yet limited, evidence has implicated alterations in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release, and the subsequent interaction of 5-HT with specific 5-HT receptor subtypes, in the altered gut function of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional bowel diseases. Alterations to enterochromaffin cells and/or 5-HT signaling can result in gastrointestinal dysmotility, visceral hypersensitivity and secretomotor abnormalities in the gut. Evidence is beginning to link disturbed 5-HT physiology with the pathophysiology of diarrhea and constipation in IBS, and with slow-transit constipation. This review discusses the current evidence on the pathobiology of these systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-60
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Investigational Drugs
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Enterochromaffin Cells
Serotonin
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Constipation
Serotonin Receptors
Health Care Costs
Diarrhea
Hypersensitivity
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • 5-HT
  • Enterochromaffin cells
  • Irritable bowel syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Crowell, M. D., Shetzline, M. A., Moses, P. L., Mawe, G. M., & Talley, N. J. (2004). Enterochromaffin cells and 5-HT signaling in the pathophysiology of disorders of gastrointestinal function. Current Opinion in Investigational Drugs, 5(1), 55-60.

Enterochromaffin cells and 5-HT signaling in the pathophysiology of disorders of gastrointestinal function. / Crowell, Michael D.; Shetzline, Michael A.; Moses, Peter L.; Mawe, Gary M.; Talley, Nicholas J.

In: Current Opinion in Investigational Drugs, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 55-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crowell, MD, Shetzline, MA, Moses, PL, Mawe, GM & Talley, NJ 2004, 'Enterochromaffin cells and 5-HT signaling in the pathophysiology of disorders of gastrointestinal function', Current Opinion in Investigational Drugs, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 55-60.
Crowell, Michael D. ; Shetzline, Michael A. ; Moses, Peter L. ; Mawe, Gary M. ; Talley, Nicholas J. / Enterochromaffin cells and 5-HT signaling in the pathophysiology of disorders of gastrointestinal function. In: Current Opinion in Investigational Drugs. 2004 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 55-60.
@article{696a8b2025944a629c64b2aa20b7b1a4,
title = "Enterochromaffin cells and 5-HT signaling in the pathophysiology of disorders of gastrointestinal function",
abstract = "Disorders of gastrointestinal function are common and significantly reduce quality-of-life, as well as negatively impacting healthcare costs. Consequently, there is much interest in understanding the pathogenesis of these disorders. Increasing, albeit as yet limited, evidence has implicated alterations in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release, and the subsequent interaction of 5-HT with specific 5-HT receptor subtypes, in the altered gut function of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional bowel diseases. Alterations to enterochromaffin cells and/or 5-HT signaling can result in gastrointestinal dysmotility, visceral hypersensitivity and secretomotor abnormalities in the gut. Evidence is beginning to link disturbed 5-HT physiology with the pathophysiology of diarrhea and constipation in IBS, and with slow-transit constipation. This review discusses the current evidence on the pathobiology of these systems.",
keywords = "5-HT, Enterochromaffin cells, Irritable bowel syndrome",
author = "Crowell, {Michael D.} and Shetzline, {Michael A.} and Moses, {Peter L.} and Mawe, {Gary M.} and Talley, {Nicholas J.}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "55--60",
journal = "Current Opinion in Investigational Drugs",
issn = "1354-3784",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enterochromaffin cells and 5-HT signaling in the pathophysiology of disorders of gastrointestinal function

AU - Crowell, Michael D.

AU - Shetzline, Michael A.

AU - Moses, Peter L.

AU - Mawe, Gary M.

AU - Talley, Nicholas J.

PY - 2004/1

Y1 - 2004/1

N2 - Disorders of gastrointestinal function are common and significantly reduce quality-of-life, as well as negatively impacting healthcare costs. Consequently, there is much interest in understanding the pathogenesis of these disorders. Increasing, albeit as yet limited, evidence has implicated alterations in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release, and the subsequent interaction of 5-HT with specific 5-HT receptor subtypes, in the altered gut function of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional bowel diseases. Alterations to enterochromaffin cells and/or 5-HT signaling can result in gastrointestinal dysmotility, visceral hypersensitivity and secretomotor abnormalities in the gut. Evidence is beginning to link disturbed 5-HT physiology with the pathophysiology of diarrhea and constipation in IBS, and with slow-transit constipation. This review discusses the current evidence on the pathobiology of these systems.

AB - Disorders of gastrointestinal function are common and significantly reduce quality-of-life, as well as negatively impacting healthcare costs. Consequently, there is much interest in understanding the pathogenesis of these disorders. Increasing, albeit as yet limited, evidence has implicated alterations in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release, and the subsequent interaction of 5-HT with specific 5-HT receptor subtypes, in the altered gut function of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional bowel diseases. Alterations to enterochromaffin cells and/or 5-HT signaling can result in gastrointestinal dysmotility, visceral hypersensitivity and secretomotor abnormalities in the gut. Evidence is beginning to link disturbed 5-HT physiology with the pathophysiology of diarrhea and constipation in IBS, and with slow-transit constipation. This review discusses the current evidence on the pathobiology of these systems.

KW - 5-HT

KW - Enterochromaffin cells

KW - Irritable bowel syndrome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2342438410&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2342438410&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 14983974

AN - SCOPUS:2342438410

VL - 5

SP - 55

EP - 60

JO - Current Opinion in Investigational Drugs

JF - Current Opinion in Investigational Drugs

SN - 1354-3784

IS - 1

ER -