Enteric physiology of the transplanted gut: Absorption and motility

Michael G. Sarr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tremendous progress has been made recently in small bowel transplantation. However, our understanding of the enteric function of the transplanted gut remains in its infancy. Unlike many of the other organs commonly transplanted, the function of the transplanted gut appears to be markedly affected by the consequences of the transplantation procedure (denervation, lymphatic disruption, and immune phenomena). This review discusses the effects of gut transplantation on segmental enteric function, concentrating on absorption and motility. Once many of the problems related to the current means of immunosuppression have been better solved, gut transplantation may prove to be an important addition for gastrointestinal surgeons to the care of patients with intestinal insufficiency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-193
Number of pages13
JournalDigestive Surgery
Volume13
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Transplantation
Denervation
Immunosuppression
Patient Care
Gastrointestinal Absorption

Keywords

  • Absorption
  • Enteric function
  • Migrating motor complex
  • Motility
  • Small bowel transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Enteric physiology of the transplanted gut : Absorption and motility. / Sarr, Michael G.

In: Digestive Surgery, Vol. 13, No. 3, 1996, p. 181-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sarr, Michael G. / Enteric physiology of the transplanted gut : Absorption and motility. In: Digestive Surgery. 1996 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 181-193.
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