Enlarging vertebrobasilar nonsaccular intracranial aneurysms: Frequency, predictors, and clinical outcome of growth

Wells I. Mangrum, John Huston, Michael J. Link, David O. Wiebers, Robyn L. McClelland, Teresa J H Christianson, Kelly Flemming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object. Vertebrobasilar nonsaccular intracranial aneurysms (NIAs) are characterized by elongation, dilation, and tortuosity of the vertebrobasilar arteries. The goal of this study was to define the frequency, predictors, and clinical outcome of the enlargement of vertebrobasilar NIAs. Methods. Patients with vertebrobasilar fusiform or dolichoectatic aneurysms demonstrated on imaging studies between 1989 and 2001 were identified. In particular, patients who had undergone serial imaging were included in this study and their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Prospective information was collected from medical records or death certificates when available. Both initial and serial imaging studies were reviewed. The authors defined NIA enlargement as a change in lesion diameter greater than 2 mm or noted on the neuroradiologist's report. A Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model time from diagnosis of the vertebrobasilar NIA to the first documented enlargement as a function of various predictors. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to study patient death as a function of aneurysm growth. Of the 159 patients with a diagnosis of vertebrobasilar NIA, 52 had undergone serial imaging studies including 25 patients with aneurysm enlargement. Lesion growth significantly correlated with symptomatic compression at the initial diagnosis (p = 0.0028), lesion type (p < 0.001), and the initial maximal lesion diameter (median 15 mm in patients whose aneurysm enlarged compared with median 8 mm in patients whose aneurysm did not enlarge; p < 0.001). The mortality rate was 5.7 times higher in patients with aneurysm growth than in those with no enlargement after adjustment for patient age (p = 0.002). Conclusions. Forty-eight percent of vertebrobasilar NIAs demonstrated on serial imaging enlarged, and this growth was associated with significant morbidity and death. Significant risk factors for aneurysm enlargement included symptomatic compression at the initial diagnosis, transitional or fusiform vertebrobasilar NIAs, and initial lesion diameter. Further studies are necessary to determine appropriate treatments of this disease entity once enlargement has been predicted or occurs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-79
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume102
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

Fingerprint

Intracranial Aneurysm
Aneurysm
Growth
Medical Records
Death Certificates
Dilatation
Arteries
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Aneurysm growth
  • Dolichoectasia
  • Vertebrobasilar nonsacular aneurysm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Enlarging vertebrobasilar nonsaccular intracranial aneurysms : Frequency, predictors, and clinical outcome of growth. / Mangrum, Wells I.; Huston, John; Link, Michael J.; Wiebers, David O.; McClelland, Robyn L.; Christianson, Teresa J H; Flemming, Kelly.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 102, No. 1, 01.2005, p. 72-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mangrum, Wells I. ; Huston, John ; Link, Michael J. ; Wiebers, David O. ; McClelland, Robyn L. ; Christianson, Teresa J H ; Flemming, Kelly. / Enlarging vertebrobasilar nonsaccular intracranial aneurysms : Frequency, predictors, and clinical outcome of growth. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2005 ; Vol. 102, No. 1. pp. 72-79.
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abstract = "Object. Vertebrobasilar nonsaccular intracranial aneurysms (NIAs) are characterized by elongation, dilation, and tortuosity of the vertebrobasilar arteries. The goal of this study was to define the frequency, predictors, and clinical outcome of the enlargement of vertebrobasilar NIAs. Methods. Patients with vertebrobasilar fusiform or dolichoectatic aneurysms demonstrated on imaging studies between 1989 and 2001 were identified. In particular, patients who had undergone serial imaging were included in this study and their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Prospective information was collected from medical records or death certificates when available. Both initial and serial imaging studies were reviewed. The authors defined NIA enlargement as a change in lesion diameter greater than 2 mm or noted on the neuroradiologist's report. A Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model time from diagnosis of the vertebrobasilar NIA to the first documented enlargement as a function of various predictors. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to study patient death as a function of aneurysm growth. Of the 159 patients with a diagnosis of vertebrobasilar NIA, 52 had undergone serial imaging studies including 25 patients with aneurysm enlargement. Lesion growth significantly correlated with symptomatic compression at the initial diagnosis (p = 0.0028), lesion type (p < 0.001), and the initial maximal lesion diameter (median 15 mm in patients whose aneurysm enlarged compared with median 8 mm in patients whose aneurysm did not enlarge; p < 0.001). The mortality rate was 5.7 times higher in patients with aneurysm growth than in those with no enlargement after adjustment for patient age (p = 0.002). Conclusions. Forty-eight percent of vertebrobasilar NIAs demonstrated on serial imaging enlarged, and this growth was associated with significant morbidity and death. Significant risk factors for aneurysm enlargement included symptomatic compression at the initial diagnosis, transitional or fusiform vertebrobasilar NIAs, and initial lesion diameter. Further studies are necessary to determine appropriate treatments of this disease entity once enlargement has been predicted or occurs.",
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T2 - Frequency, predictors, and clinical outcome of growth

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AU - Huston, John

AU - Link, Michael J.

AU - Wiebers, David O.

AU - McClelland, Robyn L.

AU - Christianson, Teresa J H

AU - Flemming, Kelly

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N2 - Object. Vertebrobasilar nonsaccular intracranial aneurysms (NIAs) are characterized by elongation, dilation, and tortuosity of the vertebrobasilar arteries. The goal of this study was to define the frequency, predictors, and clinical outcome of the enlargement of vertebrobasilar NIAs. Methods. Patients with vertebrobasilar fusiform or dolichoectatic aneurysms demonstrated on imaging studies between 1989 and 2001 were identified. In particular, patients who had undergone serial imaging were included in this study and their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Prospective information was collected from medical records or death certificates when available. Both initial and serial imaging studies were reviewed. The authors defined NIA enlargement as a change in lesion diameter greater than 2 mm or noted on the neuroradiologist's report. A Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model time from diagnosis of the vertebrobasilar NIA to the first documented enlargement as a function of various predictors. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to study patient death as a function of aneurysm growth. Of the 159 patients with a diagnosis of vertebrobasilar NIA, 52 had undergone serial imaging studies including 25 patients with aneurysm enlargement. Lesion growth significantly correlated with symptomatic compression at the initial diagnosis (p = 0.0028), lesion type (p < 0.001), and the initial maximal lesion diameter (median 15 mm in patients whose aneurysm enlarged compared with median 8 mm in patients whose aneurysm did not enlarge; p < 0.001). The mortality rate was 5.7 times higher in patients with aneurysm growth than in those with no enlargement after adjustment for patient age (p = 0.002). Conclusions. Forty-eight percent of vertebrobasilar NIAs demonstrated on serial imaging enlarged, and this growth was associated with significant morbidity and death. Significant risk factors for aneurysm enlargement included symptomatic compression at the initial diagnosis, transitional or fusiform vertebrobasilar NIAs, and initial lesion diameter. Further studies are necessary to determine appropriate treatments of this disease entity once enlargement has been predicted or occurs.

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KW - Dolichoectasia

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