Engineering targeted viral vectors for gene therapy

Reinhard Waehler, Stephen J Russell, David T. Curiel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

450 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To achieve therapeutic success, transfer vehicles for gene therapy must be capable of transducing target cells while avoiding impact on non-target cells. Despite the high transduction efficiency of viral vectors, their tropism frequently does not match the therapeutic need. In the past, this lack of appropriate targeting allowed only partial exploitation of the great potential of gene therapy. Substantial progress in modifying viral vectors using diverse techniques now allows targeting to many cell types in vitro. Although important challenges remain for in vivo applications, the first clinical trials with targeted vectors have already begun to take place.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-587
Number of pages15
JournalNature Reviews Genetics
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2007

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gene therapy
Viral Genes
Genetic Therapy
engineering
therapeutics
tropisms
Tropism
cells
clinical trials
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Engineering targeted viral vectors for gene therapy. / Waehler, Reinhard; Russell, Stephen J; Curiel, David T.

In: Nature Reviews Genetics, Vol. 8, No. 8, 03.08.2007, p. 573-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waehler, Reinhard ; Russell, Stephen J ; Curiel, David T. / Engineering targeted viral vectors for gene therapy. In: Nature Reviews Genetics. 2007 ; Vol. 8, No. 8. pp. 573-587.
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