ENERGY REQUIREMENTS AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICAL WEED CONTROL.

Kenton R Kaufman, Le Roy W. Schaffner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A newly developed alternative for control of weeds taller than the crop is the Electrical Discharge System (EDS) weeder marketed by Lasco, Inc. The EDS unit kills weeds electrically on contact with charged probes by forcing the electrolytic solution within the plants' vascular system to conduct electrical current. The electricity in the plant, in effect, boils the plant cell solution and ruptures cell walls. To assist farm managers in their decisions regarding these selective placement methods of weed control, research was conducted to determine energy requirements of the EDS weeder, and economically compare the EDS weeder, the herbicide roller, and the recirculating sprayer. The research was based on ten field experiments. The paper discusses materials, methods and results of the study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPaper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Weed Control
economic analysis
energy requirements
weed control
Economics
electric current
Electricity
plant vascular system
sprayers
Plant Cells
Herbicides
electricity
Research
Cell Wall
probes (equipment)
Blood Vessels
Rupture
managers
herbicides
weeds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

ENERGY REQUIREMENTS AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICAL WEED CONTROL. / Kaufman, Kenton R; Schaffner, Le Roy W.

In: Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers, 01.01.1980.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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