Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with the Zenith AAA endovascular graft: Does gender affect procedural success, postoperative morbidity, or early survival?

Matthias Biebl, Albert Hakaim, Beate Hugl, Warner A. Oldenburg, Ricardo Paz-Fumagalli, J. Mark McKinney, Roy Greenberg, Timothy Chuter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of gender on deployment, early morbidity, and survival after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) using the Zenith Endovascular Graft. Data were obtained from the U.S. Multicenter Zenith Endograft trial and complemented with results from the Zenith female registry, including 40 women (10.9%) and 326 men (89.1%). Data analysis included preoperative medical risk factors, aneurysm morphology, deployment, and postoperative morbidity data, and 30-day and 1-year results. Preoperatively, women more often had experienced thromboembolic events (13% vs 4.3%; P = 0.04), but less angina pectoris (24% vs 49%; P = 0.002) or myocardial infarction (18% vs 38%; P = 0.01) compared with men. Women had more angulated aneurysm necks and narrower iliac arteries compared with men. Procedural success, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, bowel-related, neurologic, or other adverse events were comparable, as were 30-day and 1-year survival. Females experienced more wound dehiscences (5.0% vs 0.0%; P = 0.01) and open surgical conversions in the first year (5%) compared with men (0.31%) (P = 0.03). With more challenging aneurysm morphologies, women were found to be at a higher risk for conversion in the first year after EVAR using the Zenith endograft. This however does not translate into inferior survival or higher overall morbidity compared with men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1008
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume71
Issue number12
StatePublished - 2005

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Aortic Aneurysm
Morbidity
Transplants
Survival
Aneurysm
Iliac Artery
Angina Pectoris
Nervous System
Registries
Myocardial Infarction
Kidney
Lung
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with the Zenith AAA endovascular graft : Does gender affect procedural success, postoperative morbidity, or early survival? / Biebl, Matthias; Hakaim, Albert; Hugl, Beate; Oldenburg, Warner A.; Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo; McKinney, J. Mark; Greenberg, Roy; Chuter, Timothy.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 71, No. 12, 2005, p. 1001-1008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Biebl, M, Hakaim, A, Hugl, B, Oldenburg, WA, Paz-Fumagalli, R, McKinney, JM, Greenberg, R & Chuter, T 2005, 'Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with the Zenith AAA endovascular graft: Does gender affect procedural success, postoperative morbidity, or early survival?', American Surgeon, vol. 71, no. 12, pp. 1001-1008.
Biebl, Matthias ; Hakaim, Albert ; Hugl, Beate ; Oldenburg, Warner A. ; Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo ; McKinney, J. Mark ; Greenberg, Roy ; Chuter, Timothy. / Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with the Zenith AAA endovascular graft : Does gender affect procedural success, postoperative morbidity, or early survival?. In: American Surgeon. 2005 ; Vol. 71, No. 12. pp. 1001-1008.
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