Endoscopic treatment of chronic radiation proctopathy

V. S. Swaroop

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Radiation proctopathy can be a disabling delayed outcome of radiation therapy directed at pelvic malignancies. Rectal outlet bleeding can be severe enough to result in anemia and transfusion dependency. Bleeding typically develops from 6 months to 1 year after completion of radiation therapy and is caused by friable mucosal angioectasias. Although many approaches to controlling bleeding from chronic radiation proctopathy have been attempted, ranging from topical enema formulations to surgical diversion of the rectum, endoscopic coagulation therapy remains the most effective. This review provides the background issues surrounding the development of chronic bleeding radiation proctopathy and focuses on endoscopic methods of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-40
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Radiation
Hemorrhage
Radiotherapy
Enema
Therapeutics
Rectum
Anemia
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Lower gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Radiation
  • Vascular ectasias

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Endoscopic treatment of chronic radiation proctopathy. / Swaroop, V. S.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 1998, p. 36-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{07a015c1f6db4c749748f128bce605e6,
title = "Endoscopic treatment of chronic radiation proctopathy",
abstract = "Radiation proctopathy can be a disabling delayed outcome of radiation therapy directed at pelvic malignancies. Rectal outlet bleeding can be severe enough to result in anemia and transfusion dependency. Bleeding typically develops from 6 months to 1 year after completion of radiation therapy and is caused by friable mucosal angioectasias. Although many approaches to controlling bleeding from chronic radiation proctopathy have been attempted, ranging from topical enema formulations to surgical diversion of the rectum, endoscopic coagulation therapy remains the most effective. This review provides the background issues surrounding the development of chronic bleeding radiation proctopathy and focuses on endoscopic methods of treatment.",
keywords = "Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, Radiation, Vascular ectasias",
author = "Swaroop, {V. S.}",
year = "1998",
doi = "10.1097/00004836-199807000-00007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "36--40",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology",
issn = "0192-0790",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Endoscopic treatment of chronic radiation proctopathy

AU - Swaroop, V. S.

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - Radiation proctopathy can be a disabling delayed outcome of radiation therapy directed at pelvic malignancies. Rectal outlet bleeding can be severe enough to result in anemia and transfusion dependency. Bleeding typically develops from 6 months to 1 year after completion of radiation therapy and is caused by friable mucosal angioectasias. Although many approaches to controlling bleeding from chronic radiation proctopathy have been attempted, ranging from topical enema formulations to surgical diversion of the rectum, endoscopic coagulation therapy remains the most effective. This review provides the background issues surrounding the development of chronic bleeding radiation proctopathy and focuses on endoscopic methods of treatment.

AB - Radiation proctopathy can be a disabling delayed outcome of radiation therapy directed at pelvic malignancies. Rectal outlet bleeding can be severe enough to result in anemia and transfusion dependency. Bleeding typically develops from 6 months to 1 year after completion of radiation therapy and is caused by friable mucosal angioectasias. Although many approaches to controlling bleeding from chronic radiation proctopathy have been attempted, ranging from topical enema formulations to surgical diversion of the rectum, endoscopic coagulation therapy remains the most effective. This review provides the background issues surrounding the development of chronic bleeding radiation proctopathy and focuses on endoscopic methods of treatment.

KW - Lower gastrointestinal bleeding

KW - Radiation

KW - Vascular ectasias

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031824541&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031824541&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00004836-199807000-00007

DO - 10.1097/00004836-199807000-00007

M3 - Review article

VL - 27

SP - 36

EP - 40

JO - Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

JF - Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

SN - 0192-0790

IS - 1

ER -