Endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling of the duodenum and rectum: A pilot survival study in a porcine model to detect myenteric neurons

Elizabeth Rajan, Badr Al-Bawardy, Christopher J. Gostout, Louis Michele Wong Kee Song, Jodie L. Deters, Mary A. Knipschield, Cheryl E. Bernard, Gianrico Farrugia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: Small bowel and colorectal muscle biopsy sampling requires a surgical approach. Advancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of motility disorders, such as functional bowel disorders, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and slow-transit constipation, is hindered by our inability to noninvasively obtain muscularis propria (MP) for evaluation of multiple cell types, including myenteric neurons. The aims of this study were to determine (1) technical feasibility, reproducibility, and safety of performing duodenal endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling (dEMB) and rectal endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling (rEMB) using a clip-assist technique and (2) the presence of myenteric neurons in tissue samples. Methods: Five 40-kg pigs were studied. Each animal underwent a dEMB and rEMB procedure. dEMB was performed using a single resection clip-assist technique. An over-the-scope clip was advanced to the duodenum. Tissue was suctioned into the cap and the clip deployed. The pseudopolyp of the duodenal wall created was then resected using snare electrocautery. rEMB was performed using a double resection clip-assist technique. EMR was initially performed to uncover the underlying MP using a band ligation technique. An over-the-scope clip was then advanced to the exposed MP. The MP was retracted and suctioned into the cap and the clip deployed. The pseudopolyp of the MP was resected using snare electrocautery. An antibody to protein gene product 9.5 was used to determine the presence of myenteric neurons in the samples. Animals were kept alive for 2 weeks, at which time an upper endoscopy and necropsy were performed. Results: dEMB and rEMB were successfully performed in all animals with no procedural adverse events using this "no hole" (close then cut) approach. Mean procedure times for dEMB and rEMB were 23.7 ± 2.5 minutes and 13.25 ± 2.8 minutes, respectively. Mean length of resected full-thickness duodenal wall was 13.25 ± 4.3 mm and rectal MP was 12.5 ± 1.7 mm. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and antibody to protein gene product 9.5 confirmed the presence of MP with inner circular, outer longitudinal, and intermuscular layers, including myenteric neurons, in all samples. Clinical course was uneventful in all animals. Repeat upper endoscopy at 2 weeks showed well-healed dEMB sites. Necropsy in all animals showed no perforation, fluid collection, or abscess at the dEMB and rEMB sites. Conclusions: Based on this preclinical study, dEMB and rEMB appear to be technically feasible, reproducible, and safe. Sufficient MP tissue was obtained to identify myenteric neurons. These promising results are a step toward successful and safe implementation of these techniques into clinical practice for tissue diagnosis of muscle-based pathologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Duodenum
Rectum
Swine
Biopsy
Neurons
Muscles
Surgical Instruments
Electrocoagulation
Endoscopy
Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction
Antibodies
Constipation
Hematoxylin
Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
Abscess
Ligation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling of the duodenum and rectum : A pilot survival study in a porcine model to detect myenteric neurons. / Rajan, Elizabeth; Al-Bawardy, Badr; Gostout, Christopher J.; Wong Kee Song, Louis Michele; Deters, Jodie L.; Knipschield, Mary A.; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Farrugia, Gianrico.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rajan, Elizabeth ; Al-Bawardy, Badr ; Gostout, Christopher J. ; Wong Kee Song, Louis Michele ; Deters, Jodie L. ; Knipschield, Mary A. ; Bernard, Cheryl E. ; Farrugia, Gianrico. / Endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling of the duodenum and rectum : A pilot survival study in a porcine model to detect myenteric neurons. In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2017.
@article{ad1ca90f729743ba911030f364570939,
title = "Endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling of the duodenum and rectum: A pilot survival study in a porcine model to detect myenteric neurons",
abstract = "Background and Aims: Small bowel and colorectal muscle biopsy sampling requires a surgical approach. Advancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of motility disorders, such as functional bowel disorders, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and slow-transit constipation, is hindered by our inability to noninvasively obtain muscularis propria (MP) for evaluation of multiple cell types, including myenteric neurons. The aims of this study were to determine (1) technical feasibility, reproducibility, and safety of performing duodenal endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling (dEMB) and rectal endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling (rEMB) using a clip-assist technique and (2) the presence of myenteric neurons in tissue samples. Methods: Five 40-kg pigs were studied. Each animal underwent a dEMB and rEMB procedure. dEMB was performed using a single resection clip-assist technique. An over-the-scope clip was advanced to the duodenum. Tissue was suctioned into the cap and the clip deployed. The pseudopolyp of the duodenal wall created was then resected using snare electrocautery. rEMB was performed using a double resection clip-assist technique. EMR was initially performed to uncover the underlying MP using a band ligation technique. An over-the-scope clip was then advanced to the exposed MP. The MP was retracted and suctioned into the cap and the clip deployed. The pseudopolyp of the MP was resected using snare electrocautery. An antibody to protein gene product 9.5 was used to determine the presence of myenteric neurons in the samples. Animals were kept alive for 2 weeks, at which time an upper endoscopy and necropsy were performed. Results: dEMB and rEMB were successfully performed in all animals with no procedural adverse events using this {"}no hole{"} (close then cut) approach. Mean procedure times for dEMB and rEMB were 23.7 ± 2.5 minutes and 13.25 ± 2.8 minutes, respectively. Mean length of resected full-thickness duodenal wall was 13.25 ± 4.3 mm and rectal MP was 12.5 ± 1.7 mm. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and antibody to protein gene product 9.5 confirmed the presence of MP with inner circular, outer longitudinal, and intermuscular layers, including myenteric neurons, in all samples. Clinical course was uneventful in all animals. Repeat upper endoscopy at 2 weeks showed well-healed dEMB sites. Necropsy in all animals showed no perforation, fluid collection, or abscess at the dEMB and rEMB sites. Conclusions: Based on this preclinical study, dEMB and rEMB appear to be technically feasible, reproducible, and safe. Sufficient MP tissue was obtained to identify myenteric neurons. These promising results are a step toward successful and safe implementation of these techniques into clinical practice for tissue diagnosis of muscle-based pathologies.",
author = "Elizabeth Rajan and Badr Al-Bawardy and Gostout, {Christopher J.} and {Wong Kee Song}, {Louis Michele} and Deters, {Jodie L.} and Knipschield, {Mary A.} and Bernard, {Cheryl E.} and Gianrico Farrugia",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.gie.2017.07.023",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Gastrointestinal Endoscopy",
issn = "0016-5107",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling of the duodenum and rectum

T2 - A pilot survival study in a porcine model to detect myenteric neurons

AU - Rajan, Elizabeth

AU - Al-Bawardy, Badr

AU - Gostout, Christopher J.

AU - Wong Kee Song, Louis Michele

AU - Deters, Jodie L.

AU - Knipschield, Mary A.

AU - Bernard, Cheryl E.

AU - Farrugia, Gianrico

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background and Aims: Small bowel and colorectal muscle biopsy sampling requires a surgical approach. Advancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of motility disorders, such as functional bowel disorders, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and slow-transit constipation, is hindered by our inability to noninvasively obtain muscularis propria (MP) for evaluation of multiple cell types, including myenteric neurons. The aims of this study were to determine (1) technical feasibility, reproducibility, and safety of performing duodenal endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling (dEMB) and rectal endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling (rEMB) using a clip-assist technique and (2) the presence of myenteric neurons in tissue samples. Methods: Five 40-kg pigs were studied. Each animal underwent a dEMB and rEMB procedure. dEMB was performed using a single resection clip-assist technique. An over-the-scope clip was advanced to the duodenum. Tissue was suctioned into the cap and the clip deployed. The pseudopolyp of the duodenal wall created was then resected using snare electrocautery. rEMB was performed using a double resection clip-assist technique. EMR was initially performed to uncover the underlying MP using a band ligation technique. An over-the-scope clip was then advanced to the exposed MP. The MP was retracted and suctioned into the cap and the clip deployed. The pseudopolyp of the MP was resected using snare electrocautery. An antibody to protein gene product 9.5 was used to determine the presence of myenteric neurons in the samples. Animals were kept alive for 2 weeks, at which time an upper endoscopy and necropsy were performed. Results: dEMB and rEMB were successfully performed in all animals with no procedural adverse events using this "no hole" (close then cut) approach. Mean procedure times for dEMB and rEMB were 23.7 ± 2.5 minutes and 13.25 ± 2.8 minutes, respectively. Mean length of resected full-thickness duodenal wall was 13.25 ± 4.3 mm and rectal MP was 12.5 ± 1.7 mm. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and antibody to protein gene product 9.5 confirmed the presence of MP with inner circular, outer longitudinal, and intermuscular layers, including myenteric neurons, in all samples. Clinical course was uneventful in all animals. Repeat upper endoscopy at 2 weeks showed well-healed dEMB sites. Necropsy in all animals showed no perforation, fluid collection, or abscess at the dEMB and rEMB sites. Conclusions: Based on this preclinical study, dEMB and rEMB appear to be technically feasible, reproducible, and safe. Sufficient MP tissue was obtained to identify myenteric neurons. These promising results are a step toward successful and safe implementation of these techniques into clinical practice for tissue diagnosis of muscle-based pathologies.

AB - Background and Aims: Small bowel and colorectal muscle biopsy sampling requires a surgical approach. Advancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of motility disorders, such as functional bowel disorders, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and slow-transit constipation, is hindered by our inability to noninvasively obtain muscularis propria (MP) for evaluation of multiple cell types, including myenteric neurons. The aims of this study were to determine (1) technical feasibility, reproducibility, and safety of performing duodenal endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling (dEMB) and rectal endoscopic muscle biopsy sampling (rEMB) using a clip-assist technique and (2) the presence of myenteric neurons in tissue samples. Methods: Five 40-kg pigs were studied. Each animal underwent a dEMB and rEMB procedure. dEMB was performed using a single resection clip-assist technique. An over-the-scope clip was advanced to the duodenum. Tissue was suctioned into the cap and the clip deployed. The pseudopolyp of the duodenal wall created was then resected using snare electrocautery. rEMB was performed using a double resection clip-assist technique. EMR was initially performed to uncover the underlying MP using a band ligation technique. An over-the-scope clip was then advanced to the exposed MP. The MP was retracted and suctioned into the cap and the clip deployed. The pseudopolyp of the MP was resected using snare electrocautery. An antibody to protein gene product 9.5 was used to determine the presence of myenteric neurons in the samples. Animals were kept alive for 2 weeks, at which time an upper endoscopy and necropsy were performed. Results: dEMB and rEMB were successfully performed in all animals with no procedural adverse events using this "no hole" (close then cut) approach. Mean procedure times for dEMB and rEMB were 23.7 ± 2.5 minutes and 13.25 ± 2.8 minutes, respectively. Mean length of resected full-thickness duodenal wall was 13.25 ± 4.3 mm and rectal MP was 12.5 ± 1.7 mm. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and antibody to protein gene product 9.5 confirmed the presence of MP with inner circular, outer longitudinal, and intermuscular layers, including myenteric neurons, in all samples. Clinical course was uneventful in all animals. Repeat upper endoscopy at 2 weeks showed well-healed dEMB sites. Necropsy in all animals showed no perforation, fluid collection, or abscess at the dEMB and rEMB sites. Conclusions: Based on this preclinical study, dEMB and rEMB appear to be technically feasible, reproducible, and safe. Sufficient MP tissue was obtained to identify myenteric neurons. These promising results are a step toward successful and safe implementation of these techniques into clinical practice for tissue diagnosis of muscle-based pathologies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85029505814&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85029505814&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.gie.2017.07.023

DO - 10.1016/j.gie.2017.07.023

M3 - Article

C2 - 28734992

AN - SCOPUS:85029505814

JO - Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

JF - Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

SN - 0016-5107

ER -