Emerging role of cannabinoids in gastrointestinal and liver diseases: Basic and clinical aspects

A. A. Izzo, Michael Camilleri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A multitude of physiological effects and putative pathophysiological roles have been proposed for the endogenous cannabinoid system in the gastrointestinal tract, liver and pancreas. These range from effects on epithelial growth and regeneration, immune function, motor function, appetite control, fibrogenesis and secretion. Cannabinoids have the potential for therapeutic application in gut and liver diseases. Two exciting therapeutic applications in the area of reversing hepatic fibrosis as well as antineoplastic effects may have a significant impact in these diseases. This review critically appraises the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the clinical application of cannabinoid receptor-based drugs in gastrointestinal, liver and pancreatic diseases. Application of modern pharmacological principles will most probably expand the selective modulation of the cannabinoid system peripherally in humans. We anticipate that, in addition to the approval in several countries of the CB1 antagonist, rimonabant, for the treatment of obesity and associated metabolic dysfunctions, other cannabinoid modulators are likely to have an impact on human disease in the future, including hepatic fibrosis and neoplasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1140-1155
Number of pages16
JournalGut
Volume57
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

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Cannabinoids
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Liver Diseases
rimonabant
Liver
Fibrosis
Cannabinoid Receptors
Pancreatic Diseases
Appetite
Antineoplastic Agents
Gastrointestinal Tract
Regeneration
Pancreas
Therapeutics
Obesity
Pharmacology
Growth
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Emerging role of cannabinoids in gastrointestinal and liver diseases : Basic and clinical aspects. / Izzo, A. A.; Camilleri, Michael.

In: Gut, Vol. 57, No. 8, 08.2008, p. 1140-1155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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