Emerging pharmacologic therapies for primary sclerosing cholangitis

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The only currently approved treatment for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is liver transplantation, with a median time to transplant of 12–18 years after diagnosis. There are a number of emerging drugs that have the potential to meet this critically unmet need that will be summarized and discussed herein. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the cause of PSC is unknown, there are a number of novel therapeutics under development. These drugs target presumed pathogenic mechanisms largely extrapolated from ex-vivo and in-vivo preclinical models, as well as translational observations. SUMMARY: Future therapeutic strategies for PSC may include a multitude of complex pathogenic mechanisms encompassing pathways of immunomodulation, the microbiome and inflammation-related fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Opinion in Gastroenterology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 2 2017

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Sclerosing Cholangitis
Immunomodulation
Microbiota
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Liver Transplantation
Fibrosis
Therapeutics
Inflammation
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "Emerging pharmacologic therapies for primary sclerosing cholangitis",
abstract = "PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The only currently approved treatment for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is liver transplantation, with a median time to transplant of 12–18 years after diagnosis. There are a number of emerging drugs that have the potential to meet this critically unmet need that will be summarized and discussed herein. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the cause of PSC is unknown, there are a number of novel therapeutics under development. These drugs target presumed pathogenic mechanisms largely extrapolated from ex-vivo and in-vivo preclinical models, as well as translational observations. SUMMARY: Future therapeutic strategies for PSC may include a multitude of complex pathogenic mechanisms encompassing pathways of immunomodulation, the microbiome and inflammation-related fibrosis.",
author = "Cheung, {Angela C.} and Lazaridis, {Konstantinos N} and {La Russo}, {Nicholas F} and Gores, {Gregory James}",
year = "2017",
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T1 - Emerging pharmacologic therapies for primary sclerosing cholangitis

AU - Cheung, Angela C.

AU - Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

AU - La Russo, Nicholas F

AU - Gores, Gregory James

PY - 2017/3/2

Y1 - 2017/3/2

N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The only currently approved treatment for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is liver transplantation, with a median time to transplant of 12–18 years after diagnosis. There are a number of emerging drugs that have the potential to meet this critically unmet need that will be summarized and discussed herein. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the cause of PSC is unknown, there are a number of novel therapeutics under development. These drugs target presumed pathogenic mechanisms largely extrapolated from ex-vivo and in-vivo preclinical models, as well as translational observations. SUMMARY: Future therapeutic strategies for PSC may include a multitude of complex pathogenic mechanisms encompassing pathways of immunomodulation, the microbiome and inflammation-related fibrosis.

AB - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The only currently approved treatment for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is liver transplantation, with a median time to transplant of 12–18 years after diagnosis. There are a number of emerging drugs that have the potential to meet this critically unmet need that will be summarized and discussed herein. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the cause of PSC is unknown, there are a number of novel therapeutics under development. These drugs target presumed pathogenic mechanisms largely extrapolated from ex-vivo and in-vivo preclinical models, as well as translational observations. SUMMARY: Future therapeutic strategies for PSC may include a multitude of complex pathogenic mechanisms encompassing pathways of immunomodulation, the microbiome and inflammation-related fibrosis.

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