Emerging multigigahertz digital and mixed-signal integrated circuits targeted for military applications: Dependence on advanced electronic packaging to adhieve full performance

Barry Kent Gilbert, Michael J. Degerstrom, J. Zabinski, Timothy M. Schaefer, Gregg J. Fokken, Barbara A. Randall, Daniel J. Schwab, Erik S. Daniel, C. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A revolution is occurring in several device and integrated circuit technologies (silicon CMOS and its extensions such as silicon germanium and silicon on insulator [SOI], and the so-called I1I-V compound semiconductors including indium phosphide and gallium arsenide), as well as in solid-state sensors such as infrared detectors enabled by the new materials and devices. These new components are being used to enhance she performance of many systems, and even to create systems never before available, of present interest to the U.S. Department of Defense and of likely near-term interest to parts of the commercial electronics industrysuch as the landline, wireless, and satellite telecommunications industry. These new components require advanced electronic packaging that does not restrict or degrade their performance. Unfortunately, largely due to commercial cost pressures, research in and small-lot manufacture of high-performance packaging, though still feasible and not lacking for good ideas for possible enhancement, are no longer being actively pursued either by the principal U.S. government agencies (e.g., DARPA, Air Force), by the commercial electronic packaging industry, or by commercial consortia such as the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (defunct as of June 2000), Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), or Sematech Inc. [1], [2]. This paper discusses recent examples of high-performance components and integrated circuit technologies and describes how they are being exploited in new or upgraded systems. Advances in packaging technology that will be required to support the new integrated circuits are also described. In conclusion, several possible approaches are reviewed by which the United States can regain momentum in the development of performance-driven packaging technologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-442
Number of pages17
JournalProceedings of the IEEE
Volume89
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Electronics packaging
Military applications
Integrated circuits
Packaging
Silicon
Semiconductor materials
Solid-state sensors
Indium phosphide
Telecommunication industry
Industry
Regain
Infrared detectors
Gallium arsenide
Germanium
Microelectronics
Momentum
Electronic equipment
Mixed signal integrated circuits
Satellites
Air

Keywords

  • Antimonide transistors
  • CMOS on oxide
  • HBTs
  • Indium phosphide
  • MEMS components and optoelectronic packaging
  • Multichip modules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Emerging multigigahertz digital and mixed-signal integrated circuits targeted for military applications : Dependence on advanced electronic packaging to adhieve full performance. / Gilbert, Barry Kent; Degerstrom, Michael J.; Zabinski, J.; Schaefer, Timothy M.; Fokken, Gregg J.; Randall, Barbara A.; Schwab, Daniel J.; Daniel, Erik S.; Scott, C.

In: Proceedings of the IEEE, Vol. 89, No. 4, 2001, p. 426-442.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gilbert, Barry Kent ; Degerstrom, Michael J. ; Zabinski, J. ; Schaefer, Timothy M. ; Fokken, Gregg J. ; Randall, Barbara A. ; Schwab, Daniel J. ; Daniel, Erik S. ; Scott, C. / Emerging multigigahertz digital and mixed-signal integrated circuits targeted for military applications : Dependence on advanced electronic packaging to adhieve full performance. In: Proceedings of the IEEE. 2001 ; Vol. 89, No. 4. pp. 426-442.
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