Emergency Department Rotational Patient Assignment Presented at the Society for Academic Medicine meeting, May 2014, Dallas, TX.

Stephen Traub, Christopher F. Stewart, Roshanak Didehban, Adam C. Bartley, Soroush Saghafian, Vernon D. Smith, Scott M. Silvers, Ryan Lecheminant, Christopher A. Lipinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study objective We compare emergency department (ED) operational metrics obtained in the first year of a rotational patient assignment system (in which patients are assigned to physicians automatically according to an algorithm) with those obtained in the last year of a traditional physician self-assignment system (in which physicians assigned themselves to patients at physician discretion). Methods This was a pre-post retrospective study of patients at a single ED with no financial incentives for physician productivity. Metrics of interest were length of stay; arrival-to-provider time; rates of left before being seen, left subsequent to being seen, early returns (within 72 hours), and early returns with admission; and complaint ratio. Results We analyzed 23,514 visits in the last year of physician self-assignment and 24,112 visits in the first year of rotational patient assignment. Rotational patient assignment was associated with the following improvements (percentage change): median length of stay 232 to 207 minutes (11%), median arrival to provider time 39 to 22 minutes (44%), left before being seen 0.73% to 0.36% (51%), and complaint ratio 9.0/1,000 to 5.4/1,000 (40%). There were no changes in left subsequent to being seen, early returns, or early returns with admission. Conclusion In a single facility, the transition from physician self-assignment to rotational patient assignment was associated with improvement in a broad array of ED operational metrics. Rotational patient assignment may be a useful strategy in ED front-end process redesign.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-215
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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    Traub, S., Stewart, C. F., Didehban, R., Bartley, A. C., Saghafian, S., Smith, V. D., Silvers, S. M., Lecheminant, R., & Lipinski, C. A. (2016). Emergency Department Rotational Patient Assignment Presented at the Society for Academic Medicine meeting, May 2014, Dallas, TX. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 67(2), 206-215. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.07.008