Elucidating a false-negative MYC break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization probe study by next-generation sequencing in a patient with high-grade B-cell lymphoma with IGH/MYC and IGH/BCL2 rearrangements

Jess F. Peterson, Beth A. Pitel, Stephanie A. Smoley, George Vasmatzis, James B. Smadbeck, Patricia T. Greipp, Rhett P. Ketterling, William R. Macon, Linda B. Baughn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The identification of MYC rearrangements in several mature B-cell neoplasms is critical for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Commercially available fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe sets, including IGH/MYC dual-color dual-fusion (D-FISH) and MYC break-apart probes (BAPs), serve as the primary methodology utilized to detect MYC rearrangements. However, performing either IGH/MYC D-FISH or MYC BAP FISH studies in isolation has been reported to result in false-negative results because of the complex nature of 8q24 rearrangements involving the MYC gene region. We report a 60-yr-old male with newly diagnosed high-grade B-cell lymphoma with a negative MYC BAP study, but with positive BCL2 and BCL6 BAP studies. Per our current laboratory algorithm to concurrently interrogate the MYC gene region with both MYC BAP and IGH/MYC D-FISH probe sets, we performed IGH/MYC D-FISH studies and detected an IGH/MYC fusion. To further characterize the discrepant MYC results obtained by FISH, a next-generation sequencing strategy, mate-pair sequencing (MPseq), was performed and revealed a small insertion (∼200 kb) of the IGH locus downstream from the MYC gene that was undetectable by MYC BAP studies. This case highlights the importance of utilizing both IGH/MYC D-FISH and MYC BAP sets to detect potential cryptic MYC rearrangements and also demonstrates the power of MPseq to characterize complex structural rearrangements and copy-number abnormalities unappreciable by FISH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbera004077
JournalCold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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