Elevated C-reactive protein in acute coronary syndrome presentation is an independent predictor of long-term mortality and heart failure

Peter A. Kavsak, Andrew R. MacRae, Alice M. Newman, Viliam Lustig, Glenn E. Palomaki, Dennis T. Ko, Jack V. Tu, Allan S. Jaffe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the ability of C-reactive protein (CRP) to predict long-term outcomes in a chest pain population. Design and methods: CRP was measured at presentation in 446 emergency department patients with acute coronary syndromes. All-cause mortality and hospital discharges for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and congestive heart failure (CHF) were obtained for up to 8 years following the event. Results: Kaplan-Meier analyses indicated that patients with CRP concentrations above the American Heart Association scientific statement cut-off had a higher rate for death and CHF admissions. After adjusting for troponin concentrations, in a Cox proportional hazard model, only CRP concentrations indicative of an acute phase response (i.e., > 7.44 mg/L) were associated with a significant risk for death after 5 years and CHF readmission after 2 years. Conclusions: Patients presenting early with chest pain with elevated CRP concentrations have a greater long-term risk for death and heart failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-329
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Biochemistry
Volume40
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • C-reactive protein
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Death
  • Emergency department

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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