Efficacy, speed of action and tolerability of almotriptan in the acute treatment of migraine: Pooled individual patient data from four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials

C. G. Dahlöf, J. Pascual, D. W. Dodick, A. J. Dowson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

A meta-analysis of pooled individual patient data from four randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials comparing several doses of almotriptan (n = 1908) with placebo (n = 386) was used to investigate the efficacy, speed of onset and tolerability of almotriptan in the acute treatment of migraine. As early as 30 min after dosing, almotriptan 12.5 mg was significantly more effective than placebo for pain relief (14.9% vs. 8.2%; P < 0.05) and pain free (2.5% vs. 0.7%; P < 0.05). At 2 h, pain-relief rates were 56.0%, 63.7% and 66.0% for almotriptan 6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg, respectively, compared with 35% for placebo; 2-h pain-free rates were 26.7%, 36.4% and 43.4% compared with 13.9% for placebo. All almotriptan dosages were significantly more effective than placebo in eliminating migraine-associated symptoms (P < 0.05) and in achieving sustained pain relief up to 24 h (P < 0.05). The incidence of adverse events after almotriptan 6.25 mg and 12.5 mg was not significantly different from that of placebo. This meta-analysis confirms the findings of individual clinical trials, while demonstrating for the first time, significant pain-free efficacy at 30 min compared with placebo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)400-408
Number of pages9
JournalCephalalgia
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

Keywords

  • Almotriptan
  • Efficacy
  • Meta-analysis
  • Migraine
  • Onset of action
  • Tolerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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