Effects of patient-controlled abdominal compression on standing systolic blood pressure in adults with orthostatic hypotension

Juan J. Figueroa, Wolfgang Singer, Paola Sandroni, David M. Sletten, Tonette L. Gehrking, Jade A. Gehrking, Phillip Low, Jeffrey R. Basford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To assess the effects of patient-controlled abdominal compression on postural changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) associated with orthostatic hypotension (OH). Secondary variables included subject assessments of their preferences and the ease-of-use. Design Randomized crossover trial. Setting Clinical research laboratory. Participants Adults with neurogenic OH (N=13). Interventions Four maneuvers were performed: moving from supine to standing without abdominal compression; moving from supine to standing with either a conventional or an adjustable abdominal binder in place; application of subject-determined maximal tolerable abdominal compression while standing; and while still erect, subsequent reduction of abdominal compression to a level the subject believed would be tolerable for a prolonged period. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome variable included postural changes in SBP. Secondary outcome variables included subject assessments of their preferences and ease of use. Results Baseline median SBP in the supine position was not affected by mild (10mmHg) abdominal compression prior to rising (without abdominal compression: 146mmHg; interquartile range, 124-164mmHg; with the conventional binder: 145mmHg; interquartile range, 129-167mmHg; with the adjustable binder: 153mmHg, interquartile range, 129-160mmHg; P=.85). Standing without a binder was associated with an -57mmHg (interquartile range, -40 to -76mmHg) SBP decrease. Levels of compression of 10mmHg applied prior to rising with the conventional and adjustable binders blunted these drops to -50mmHg (interquartile range, -33 to -70mmHg; P=.03) and -46mmHg (interquartile range, -34 to -75mmHg; P=.01), respectively. Increasing compression to subject-selected maximal tolerance while standing did not provide additional benefit and was associated with drops of -53mmHg (interquartile range, -26 to -71mmHg; P=.64) and -59mmHg (interquartile range, -49 to -76mmHg; P=.52) for the conventional and adjustable binders, respectively. Subsequent reduction of compression to more tolerable levels tended to worsen OH with both the conventional (-61mmHg; interquartile range, -33 to -80mmHg; P=.64) and adjustable (-67mmHg; interquartile range, -61 to -84mmHg; P=.79) binders. Subjects reported no differences in preferences between the binders in terms of preference or ease of use. Conclusions These results suggest that mild (10mmHg) abdominal compression prior to rising can ameliorate OH, but further compression once standing does not result in additional benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-510
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume96
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Keywords

  • Orthostatic intolerance
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of patient-controlled abdominal compression on standing systolic blood pressure in adults with orthostatic hypotension'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this