Effects of oxygen tension and shear stress on human endothelial cell prostacyclin production

Hiram M. Soler, Michael T. Watkins, Hassan Albadawi, Hiroko Kadowaki, George M. Patton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Under in vivo conditions of ischemia and reperfusion, vascular endothelium (EC) experience concurrent changes in oxygen tension, shear stress, and the local concentration of metabolites. These studies explored the combined effects of shear stress and oxygen tension on EC prostacyclin production. EC grown on microcarrier beads were exposed to 120 min of normoxia and basal shear stress by stirring at 20 rpm. After normoxia, EC were exposed to hypoxia (2% O2, 20 rpm), ischemia (2% O2, 5 rpm) or sham ischemia (20% O2, 5 rpm). Following hypoxia, EC were reoxygenated (20% O2, 20 rpm). After ischemia and sham ischemia, EC were reperfused (20% O2, 20 rpm). Minimal accumulation of metabolites occurred during normoxia, hypoxia, and reperfusion. All metabolites were allowed to accumulate in the flasks during ischemia and sham ischemia. Prostacyclin levels were measured by ELISA, and prostaglandin H2 synthase levels in cells were analyzed by immunoblotting. An acute decrease in shear stress decreased prostacyclin production. An acute decrease only in oxygen tension did not alter prostacyclin production significantly. The combined acute decrease in both shear stress and oxygen tension significantly stimulated prostacyclin production for 30 min. By 120 min of ischemia and hypoxia, prostacyclin release was significantly less than sham ischemia. Prostacyclin production after 30 min of reoxygenation was significantly less than that of cells subjected to reperfusion. By 120 min of reperfusion and reoxygenation, there was no significant difference in EC prostacyclin synthesis. These findings suggest that temporal and quantitative aspects of EC prostaglandin synthesis are dependent on both oxygen tension and shear stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-53
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Epoprostenol
Ischemia
Endothelial Cells
Oxygen
Reperfusion
Prostaglandin H2
Vascular Endothelium
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Immunoblotting
Prostaglandins
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Hypoxia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Effects of oxygen tension and shear stress on human endothelial cell prostacyclin production. / Soler, Hiram M.; Watkins, Michael T.; Albadawi, Hassan; Kadowaki, Hiroko; Patton, George M.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 67, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 46-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soler, Hiram M. ; Watkins, Michael T. ; Albadawi, Hassan ; Kadowaki, Hiroko ; Patton, George M. / Effects of oxygen tension and shear stress on human endothelial cell prostacyclin production. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 1997 ; Vol. 67, No. 1. pp. 46-53.
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