Effects of cilomilast, a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, on esophageal motility and ph, and orocecal and colonic transit

Two single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-part crossover studies in healthy volunteers

Lesley A. Houghton, Wendy Atkinson, Peter J. Whorwell, Julie Morris, Robert D. Murdoch, Stephen M. Cooper, Dawn M. Webber, Christine M. Walls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Phase IIb studies have reported that cilomilast, a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor being developed for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects (AEs) in a small proportion (≈5%) of individuals. Objectives: The aims of these 2 studies were to investigate the effects of cilomilast 15 mg BID on: (1) lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and esophageal body motility and pH (study 1); and (2) orocecal and whole-gut transit times (OCTT and WGTT, respectively) (study 2) in healthy volunteers. Methods: These 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-part crossover studies were conducted at the Neurogastroenterology Unit, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom (study 1) and GlaxoSmithKline, Harlow, United Kingdom (study 2). In study 1, subjects were randomly assigned to receive either cilomilast (15 mg BID) or matched placebo (control) for 7 days (13 doses; subjects were not given the evening dose on day 7), and in study 2, cilomilast (15 mg BID) or matched placebo (control) for 9 days (18 doses) in each of 2 treatment periods. After study drug administration, combined esophageal motility and pH were recorded for 2 hours before and 4 hours after the administration of a standardized meal (2400 kJ [573 kcal]). Sequences of 6 consecutive 5-mL water swallows (separated by 20 seconds) were carried out 60 and 90 minutes (fasting) and 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, and 360 minutes (fed) after study drug administration. OCTT was determined from the increase in breath hydrogen after the meal. WGTT was determined from the time taken to excrete at least 16 of 20 ingested radiopaque markers, ingested as 2 capsules, each containing 10 radiopaque markers, with 240 mL of water. AEs were elicited at specified times throughout each session using nonleading questions, spontaneously reported AEs, and diary cards. Results: Study 1 enrolled 20 subjects (11 men, 9 women; age range, 20-52 years). Study 2 enrolled 16 subjects (10 men, 6 women; age range, 19-48 years). No clinically significant differences in the amplitude (mean difference in postprandial-preprandial AUC0-t/t, 6.09 mm Hg; 95% CI, -10.66 to 22.84), duration (difference, -0.08 second; 95% CI, -0.54 to 0.37), or velocity of propagation (difference, 0.90 cm/s; 95% CI, -0.66 to 2.46) of esophageal contractions, LESP (difference, -0.39 mm Hg; 95% CI, -5.23 to 4.45), or preprandial or postprandial percentage time pH <4 (median differences: preprandial, 0.47% [95% CI, -0.45 to 1.27]; postprandial, -0.005% [95% CI, -1.30 to 6.27]) were found with cilomilast compared with placebo. No significant differences in OCTT (difference, -0.37 hour; 95% CI, -1.59 to 0.84) or WGTT (difference, -2.96 hours; 95% CI, -20.76 to 14.84) were found with cilomilast compared with controls. In both studies, the most frequently reported AEs with cilomilast use were nausea (8/18 in study 1 and 3/16 in study 2 ) and headache (8/18 in study 1 and 6/16 in study 2); however, these were generally of mild to moderate intensity. Overall, GI AEs did not correlate with changes in GI motility. Conclusion: The results of these 2 studies suggest that cilomilast was not associated with significant changes in esophageal motility and pH or GI transit in these healthy volunteers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)569-581
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Therapeutics
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors
Cross-Over Studies
Healthy Volunteers
Placebos
Lower Esophageal Sphincter
Meals
Gastrointestinal Transit
Swallows
Pressure
Hospital Units
Gastrointestinal Motility
Cilomilast
Water
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Nausea
Capsules
Headache
Hydrogen
Fasting

Keywords

  • cilomilast
  • esophageal motility
  • esophageal pH
  • phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor
  • transit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Effects of cilomilast, a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, on esophageal motility and ph, and orocecal and colonic transit : Two single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-part crossover studies in healthy volunteers. / Houghton, Lesley A.; Atkinson, Wendy; Whorwell, Peter J.; Morris, Julie; Murdoch, Robert D.; Cooper, Stephen M.; Webber, Dawn M.; Walls, Christine M.

In: Clinical Therapeutics, Vol. 28, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 569-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Houghton, Lesley A. ; Atkinson, Wendy ; Whorwell, Peter J. ; Morris, Julie ; Murdoch, Robert D. ; Cooper, Stephen M. ; Webber, Dawn M. ; Walls, Christine M. / Effects of cilomilast, a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, on esophageal motility and ph, and orocecal and colonic transit : Two single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-part crossover studies in healthy volunteers. In: Clinical Therapeutics. 2006 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 569-581.
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abstract = "Background: Phase IIb studies have reported that cilomilast, a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor being developed for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects (AEs) in a small proportion (≈5{\%}) of individuals. Objectives: The aims of these 2 studies were to investigate the effects of cilomilast 15 mg BID on: (1) lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and esophageal body motility and pH (study 1); and (2) orocecal and whole-gut transit times (OCTT and WGTT, respectively) (study 2) in healthy volunteers. Methods: These 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-part crossover studies were conducted at the Neurogastroenterology Unit, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom (study 1) and GlaxoSmithKline, Harlow, United Kingdom (study 2). In study 1, subjects were randomly assigned to receive either cilomilast (15 mg BID) or matched placebo (control) for 7 days (13 doses; subjects were not given the evening dose on day 7), and in study 2, cilomilast (15 mg BID) or matched placebo (control) for 9 days (18 doses) in each of 2 treatment periods. After study drug administration, combined esophageal motility and pH were recorded for 2 hours before and 4 hours after the administration of a standardized meal (2400 kJ [573 kcal]). Sequences of 6 consecutive 5-mL water swallows (separated by 20 seconds) were carried out 60 and 90 minutes (fasting) and 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, and 360 minutes (fed) after study drug administration. OCTT was determined from the increase in breath hydrogen after the meal. WGTT was determined from the time taken to excrete at least 16 of 20 ingested radiopaque markers, ingested as 2 capsules, each containing 10 radiopaque markers, with 240 mL of water. AEs were elicited at specified times throughout each session using nonleading questions, spontaneously reported AEs, and diary cards. Results: Study 1 enrolled 20 subjects (11 men, 9 women; age range, 20-52 years). Study 2 enrolled 16 subjects (10 men, 6 women; age range, 19-48 years). No clinically significant differences in the amplitude (mean difference in postprandial-preprandial AUC0-t/t, 6.09 mm Hg; 95{\%} CI, -10.66 to 22.84), duration (difference, -0.08 second; 95{\%} CI, -0.54 to 0.37), or velocity of propagation (difference, 0.90 cm/s; 95{\%} CI, -0.66 to 2.46) of esophageal contractions, LESP (difference, -0.39 mm Hg; 95{\%} CI, -5.23 to 4.45), or preprandial or postprandial percentage time pH <4 (median differences: preprandial, 0.47{\%} [95{\%} CI, -0.45 to 1.27]; postprandial, -0.005{\%} [95{\%} CI, -1.30 to 6.27]) were found with cilomilast compared with placebo. No significant differences in OCTT (difference, -0.37 hour; 95{\%} CI, -1.59 to 0.84) or WGTT (difference, -2.96 hours; 95{\%} CI, -20.76 to 14.84) were found with cilomilast compared with controls. In both studies, the most frequently reported AEs with cilomilast use were nausea (8/18 in study 1 and 3/16 in study 2 ) and headache (8/18 in study 1 and 6/16 in study 2); however, these were generally of mild to moderate intensity. Overall, GI AEs did not correlate with changes in GI motility. Conclusion: The results of these 2 studies suggest that cilomilast was not associated with significant changes in esophageal motility and pH or GI transit in these healthy volunteers.",
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author = "Houghton, {Lesley A.} and Wendy Atkinson and Whorwell, {Peter J.} and Julie Morris and Murdoch, {Robert D.} and Cooper, {Stephen M.} and Webber, {Dawn M.} and Walls, {Christine M.}",
year = "2006",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of cilomilast, a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, on esophageal motility and ph, and orocecal and colonic transit

T2 - Two single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-part crossover studies in healthy volunteers

AU - Houghton, Lesley A.

AU - Atkinson, Wendy

AU - Whorwell, Peter J.

AU - Morris, Julie

AU - Murdoch, Robert D.

AU - Cooper, Stephen M.

AU - Webber, Dawn M.

AU - Walls, Christine M.

PY - 2006/4

Y1 - 2006/4

N2 - Background: Phase IIb studies have reported that cilomilast, a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor being developed for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects (AEs) in a small proportion (≈5%) of individuals. Objectives: The aims of these 2 studies were to investigate the effects of cilomilast 15 mg BID on: (1) lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and esophageal body motility and pH (study 1); and (2) orocecal and whole-gut transit times (OCTT and WGTT, respectively) (study 2) in healthy volunteers. Methods: These 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-part crossover studies were conducted at the Neurogastroenterology Unit, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom (study 1) and GlaxoSmithKline, Harlow, United Kingdom (study 2). In study 1, subjects were randomly assigned to receive either cilomilast (15 mg BID) or matched placebo (control) for 7 days (13 doses; subjects were not given the evening dose on day 7), and in study 2, cilomilast (15 mg BID) or matched placebo (control) for 9 days (18 doses) in each of 2 treatment periods. After study drug administration, combined esophageal motility and pH were recorded for 2 hours before and 4 hours after the administration of a standardized meal (2400 kJ [573 kcal]). Sequences of 6 consecutive 5-mL water swallows (separated by 20 seconds) were carried out 60 and 90 minutes (fasting) and 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, and 360 minutes (fed) after study drug administration. OCTT was determined from the increase in breath hydrogen after the meal. WGTT was determined from the time taken to excrete at least 16 of 20 ingested radiopaque markers, ingested as 2 capsules, each containing 10 radiopaque markers, with 240 mL of water. AEs were elicited at specified times throughout each session using nonleading questions, spontaneously reported AEs, and diary cards. Results: Study 1 enrolled 20 subjects (11 men, 9 women; age range, 20-52 years). Study 2 enrolled 16 subjects (10 men, 6 women; age range, 19-48 years). No clinically significant differences in the amplitude (mean difference in postprandial-preprandial AUC0-t/t, 6.09 mm Hg; 95% CI, -10.66 to 22.84), duration (difference, -0.08 second; 95% CI, -0.54 to 0.37), or velocity of propagation (difference, 0.90 cm/s; 95% CI, -0.66 to 2.46) of esophageal contractions, LESP (difference, -0.39 mm Hg; 95% CI, -5.23 to 4.45), or preprandial or postprandial percentage time pH <4 (median differences: preprandial, 0.47% [95% CI, -0.45 to 1.27]; postprandial, -0.005% [95% CI, -1.30 to 6.27]) were found with cilomilast compared with placebo. No significant differences in OCTT (difference, -0.37 hour; 95% CI, -1.59 to 0.84) or WGTT (difference, -2.96 hours; 95% CI, -20.76 to 14.84) were found with cilomilast compared with controls. In both studies, the most frequently reported AEs with cilomilast use were nausea (8/18 in study 1 and 3/16 in study 2 ) and headache (8/18 in study 1 and 6/16 in study 2); however, these were generally of mild to moderate intensity. Overall, GI AEs did not correlate with changes in GI motility. Conclusion: The results of these 2 studies suggest that cilomilast was not associated with significant changes in esophageal motility and pH or GI transit in these healthy volunteers.

AB - Background: Phase IIb studies have reported that cilomilast, a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor being developed for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects (AEs) in a small proportion (≈5%) of individuals. Objectives: The aims of these 2 studies were to investigate the effects of cilomilast 15 mg BID on: (1) lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) and esophageal body motility and pH (study 1); and (2) orocecal and whole-gut transit times (OCTT and WGTT, respectively) (study 2) in healthy volunteers. Methods: These 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-part crossover studies were conducted at the Neurogastroenterology Unit, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom (study 1) and GlaxoSmithKline, Harlow, United Kingdom (study 2). In study 1, subjects were randomly assigned to receive either cilomilast (15 mg BID) or matched placebo (control) for 7 days (13 doses; subjects were not given the evening dose on day 7), and in study 2, cilomilast (15 mg BID) or matched placebo (control) for 9 days (18 doses) in each of 2 treatment periods. After study drug administration, combined esophageal motility and pH were recorded for 2 hours before and 4 hours after the administration of a standardized meal (2400 kJ [573 kcal]). Sequences of 6 consecutive 5-mL water swallows (separated by 20 seconds) were carried out 60 and 90 minutes (fasting) and 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, and 360 minutes (fed) after study drug administration. OCTT was determined from the increase in breath hydrogen after the meal. WGTT was determined from the time taken to excrete at least 16 of 20 ingested radiopaque markers, ingested as 2 capsules, each containing 10 radiopaque markers, with 240 mL of water. AEs were elicited at specified times throughout each session using nonleading questions, spontaneously reported AEs, and diary cards. Results: Study 1 enrolled 20 subjects (11 men, 9 women; age range, 20-52 years). Study 2 enrolled 16 subjects (10 men, 6 women; age range, 19-48 years). No clinically significant differences in the amplitude (mean difference in postprandial-preprandial AUC0-t/t, 6.09 mm Hg; 95% CI, -10.66 to 22.84), duration (difference, -0.08 second; 95% CI, -0.54 to 0.37), or velocity of propagation (difference, 0.90 cm/s; 95% CI, -0.66 to 2.46) of esophageal contractions, LESP (difference, -0.39 mm Hg; 95% CI, -5.23 to 4.45), or preprandial or postprandial percentage time pH <4 (median differences: preprandial, 0.47% [95% CI, -0.45 to 1.27]; postprandial, -0.005% [95% CI, -1.30 to 6.27]) were found with cilomilast compared with placebo. No significant differences in OCTT (difference, -0.37 hour; 95% CI, -1.59 to 0.84) or WGTT (difference, -2.96 hours; 95% CI, -20.76 to 14.84) were found with cilomilast compared with controls. In both studies, the most frequently reported AEs with cilomilast use were nausea (8/18 in study 1 and 3/16 in study 2 ) and headache (8/18 in study 1 and 6/16 in study 2); however, these were generally of mild to moderate intensity. Overall, GI AEs did not correlate with changes in GI motility. Conclusion: The results of these 2 studies suggest that cilomilast was not associated with significant changes in esophageal motility and pH or GI transit in these healthy volunteers.

KW - cilomilast

KW - esophageal motility

KW - esophageal pH

KW - phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor

KW - transit

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