Effects of cholecalciferol supplementation on serum and urinary vitamin D metabolites and binding protein in HIV-infected youth

Allison Ross Eckard, Myrtle Thierry-Palmer, Natalia Silvestrov, Julia C. Rosebush, Mary Ann O'Riordan, Julie E. Daniels, Monika Uribe-Leitz, Danielle Labbato, Joshua H. Ruff, Ravinder Jit Singh, Vin Tangpricha, Grace A. McComsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin D insufficiency is widespread in HIV-infected patients. HIV and/or antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly efavirenz (EFV), may interfere with vitamin D metabolism. However, few data from randomized, controlled trials exist. Here, we investigate changes in vitamin D metabolites and binding protein (VDBP) after 6 months of supplementation in a randomized, active-control, double-blind trial investigating 2 different monthly cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) doses [60,000 (medium) or 120,000 (high) IU/month] vs. a control arm of 18,000 IU/month in 8–25 year old HIV-infected youth on ART with HIV-1 RNA <1000 copies/mL and baseline 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D3) ≤30 ng/mL. A matched healthy uninfected group was enrolled in a similar parallel study for comparison. Changes after 6 months were analyzed as intent-to-treat within/between groups [control group (low dose) vs. combined supplementation doses (medium + high)]. At 6 months, 55% vs. 82% of subjects in control and supplementation groups, respectively, reached 25(OH)D3 ≥30 ng/mL (P = 0.01) with no difference between medium and high doses (both 82% ≥30 ng/mL). There were few differences for those on EFV vs. no-EFV, except serum VDBP decreased in EFV-treated subjects (both within- and between-groups P ≤ 0.01). There were no significant differences between the HIV-infected vs. healthy uninfected groups. The major finding of the present study is that cholecalciferol supplementation (60,000 or 120,000 IU/month) effectively raises serum 25(OH)D3 in the majority of HIV-infected subjects, regardless of EFV use. Notably, response to supplementation was similar to that of uninfected subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-48
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume168
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

efavirenz
Vitamin D-Binding Protein
Cholecalciferol
Metabolites
Vitamin D
Carrier Proteins
HIV
Serum
Calcifediol
Control Groups
Metabolism
HIV-1
Blood Proteins
Randomized Controlled Trials
RNA

Keywords

  • Cholecalciferol supplementation
  • HIV
  • Pediatrics and adolescents
  • Randomized-controlled trial
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin d binding protein
  • Vitamin d metabolites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Effects of cholecalciferol supplementation on serum and urinary vitamin D metabolites and binding protein in HIV-infected youth. / Eckard, Allison Ross; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Silvestrov, Natalia; Rosebush, Julia C.; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Daniels, Julie E.; Uribe-Leitz, Monika; Labbato, Danielle; Ruff, Joshua H.; Singh, Ravinder Jit; Tangpricha, Vin; McComsey, Grace A.

In: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 168, 01.04.2017, p. 38-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eckard, AR, Thierry-Palmer, M, Silvestrov, N, Rosebush, JC, O'Riordan, MA, Daniels, JE, Uribe-Leitz, M, Labbato, D, Ruff, JH, Singh, RJ, Tangpricha, V & McComsey, GA 2017, 'Effects of cholecalciferol supplementation on serum and urinary vitamin D metabolites and binding protein in HIV-infected youth', Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, vol. 168, pp. 38-48. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2017.01.018
Eckard, Allison Ross ; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle ; Silvestrov, Natalia ; Rosebush, Julia C. ; O'Riordan, Mary Ann ; Daniels, Julie E. ; Uribe-Leitz, Monika ; Labbato, Danielle ; Ruff, Joshua H. ; Singh, Ravinder Jit ; Tangpricha, Vin ; McComsey, Grace A. / Effects of cholecalciferol supplementation on serum and urinary vitamin D metabolites and binding protein in HIV-infected youth. In: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 2017 ; Vol. 168. pp. 38-48.
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abstract = "Vitamin D insufficiency is widespread in HIV-infected patients. HIV and/or antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly efavirenz (EFV), may interfere with vitamin D metabolism. However, few data from randomized, controlled trials exist. Here, we investigate changes in vitamin D metabolites and binding protein (VDBP) after 6 months of supplementation in a randomized, active-control, double-blind trial investigating 2 different monthly cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) doses [60,000 (medium) or 120,000 (high) IU/month] vs. a control arm of 18,000 IU/month in 8–25 year old HIV-infected youth on ART with HIV-1 RNA <1000 copies/mL and baseline 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D3) ≤30 ng/mL. A matched healthy uninfected group was enrolled in a similar parallel study for comparison. Changes after 6 months were analyzed as intent-to-treat within/between groups [control group (low dose) vs. combined supplementation doses (medium + high)]. At 6 months, 55{\%} vs. 82{\%} of subjects in control and supplementation groups, respectively, reached 25(OH)D3 ≥30 ng/mL (P = 0.01) with no difference between medium and high doses (both 82{\%} ≥30 ng/mL). There were few differences for those on EFV vs. no-EFV, except serum VDBP decreased in EFV-treated subjects (both within- and between-groups P ≤ 0.01). There were no significant differences between the HIV-infected vs. healthy uninfected groups. The major finding of the present study is that cholecalciferol supplementation (60,000 or 120,000 IU/month) effectively raises serum 25(OH)D3 in the majority of HIV-infected subjects, regardless of EFV use. Notably, response to supplementation was similar to that of uninfected subjects.",
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AU - O'Riordan, Mary Ann

AU - Daniels, Julie E.

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