Effects of cardioselective and nonselective beta-adrenergic blockade on the performance of highly trained runners

Richard L. Anderson, Jack H. Wilmore, Michael Joseph Joyner, Beau J. Freund, Albert A. Hartzell, Carl A. Todd, Gordon A. Ewy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty-five highly trained runners with a maximal oxygen uptake (V02 Max) of 64.7 ± 4.3 mi · kg-1 · min-1 were administered clinically equivalent doses of a nonselective (propranolol) and a cardioselective (atenolol) β-blocking agent as well as a placebo. The subjects performed a horizontal treadmill test on the eighth day and a 10-km track race on the tenth day of each treatment. Beta blockade decreased submaximal heart rate and propranolol caused the largest decrease. Beta blockade caused a decrease in maximal heart rate, V02 Max, maximal ventilation, maximal respiratory exchange ratio and treadmill time. Propranolol caused a greater decrease than atenolol in each of these values. The 10-km race times were significantly slower during β blockade, and propranolol race times were significantly slower than atenolol race times. It is concluded that the performance of highly trained distance runners is significantly altered by β-adrenergic blockade and that nonselective agents reduce performance to a greater extent than cardioselective agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume55
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 26 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Propranolol
Adrenergic Agents
Atenolol
Heart Rate
Exercise Test
Ventilation
Placebos
Oxygen
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of cardioselective and nonselective beta-adrenergic blockade on the performance of highly trained runners. / Anderson, Richard L.; Wilmore, Jack H.; Joyner, Michael Joseph; Freund, Beau J.; Hartzell, Albert A.; Todd, Carl A.; Ewy, Gordon A.

In: The American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 55, No. 10, 26.04.1985.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, Richard L. ; Wilmore, Jack H. ; Joyner, Michael Joseph ; Freund, Beau J. ; Hartzell, Albert A. ; Todd, Carl A. ; Ewy, Gordon A. / Effects of cardioselective and nonselective beta-adrenergic blockade on the performance of highly trained runners. In: The American Journal of Cardiology. 1985 ; Vol. 55, No. 10.
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