Effects of biodegradable polymer particles on rat marrow-derived stromal osteoblasts in vitro

M. Conley Wake, Paul D. Gerecht, Lichun Lu, Antonios G. Mikos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effects of biodegradable particles of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) 50/50 with diameter ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 μm on rat marrow stromal osteoblasts in vitro have been investigated over a period of 28 days. This study examined the effects of three particle parameters, concentration, polymer molecular weight, and composition, on osteoblast proliferation and function. Cell cultures were challenged with particles at two different time points: upon cell seeding (Day 1), and after cells had begun to establish their own mineralized extracellular matrix (Day 14). The most significant trend observed in those cultures challenged with particles beginning on Day 1 was due to increasing the concentration of particles, resulting in decreased [3H]-thymidine incorporation, cell count, and mineralization. Those cultures challenged with particles beginning on Day 14 were significantly more mineralized than those challenged with particles beginning on Day 1. In addition, increasing osteocalcin secretion confirmed the osteoblastic phenotype of the derived stromal cells. These studies suggest that the particles may affect the bone remodeling process surrounding a degrading implant by direct interaction with osteoblasts in addition to their indirect contributions to the inflammatory mechanism via mediators secreted by macrophages upon their phagocytosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1255-1268
Number of pages14
JournalBiomaterials
Volume19
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biodegradable polymers
Osteoblasts
Rats
Polymers
glycolic acid
Bone Marrow
Bone Remodeling
Macrophages
Osteocalcin
Lactic acid
Stromal Cells
Phagocytosis
Cell culture
Thymidine
Extracellular Matrix
Bone
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Count
Molecular Weight
Molecular weight

Keywords

  • Bone tissue engineering
  • Osteoblast
  • Particle
  • Particulate polymer
  • Poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)
  • Poly(L-lactic acid)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Effects of biodegradable polymer particles on rat marrow-derived stromal osteoblasts in vitro. / Wake, M. Conley; Gerecht, Paul D.; Lu, Lichun; Mikos, Antonios G.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 19, No. 14, 07.1998, p. 1255-1268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wake, M. Conley ; Gerecht, Paul D. ; Lu, Lichun ; Mikos, Antonios G. / Effects of biodegradable polymer particles on rat marrow-derived stromal osteoblasts in vitro. In: Biomaterials. 1998 ; Vol. 19, No. 14. pp. 1255-1268.
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