Effects of amitriptyline on gastric sensorimotor function and postprandial symptoms in healthy individuals: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Ernest P. Bouras, Nicholas J. Talley, Michael Camilleri, Duane D. Burton, Michael G. Heckman, Juliana Crook, Elliott Richelson

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Low-dose tricyclic antidepressants have been used to treat chronic somatic and gastrointestinal pain disorders, including refractory functional dyspepsia. However, there are only limited data on the effects of these drugs on upper gastrointestinal function. AIM: To compare the effects of two doses of amitriptyline (AMT) and placebo on gastric accommodation, emptying, satiation, and postprandial symptoms in healthy volunteers. METHODS: Using a parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 41 healthy volunteers were randomized to AMT 25 mg, AMT 50 mg, or placebo for 2 wk. During the final 3 days of therapy, the following end points were assessed: fasting and postprandial gastric volumes, 2- and 4-h gastric emptying, time and volume to maximum satiation using a nutrient drink test, and postprandial symptoms 30 min later using 10-cm visual analog scales. AMT and metabolite levels were measured. RESULTS: AMT slowed gastric emptying at 2 h (median 75% for placebo, 57% for AMT 25 mg, 67% for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.037) and 4 h (median 98% for placebo, 96% for AMT 25 mg, 92% for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.003). AMT did not affect gastric volumes or satiation volume, but it did reduce nausea scores at 30 min in a dose-dependent manner (median 2.1 for placebo, 0.9 for AMT 25 mg, and 0.0 for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.009). CONCLUSION: In healthy volunteers, AMT slows gastric emptying of solids, but it does not significantly affect gastric volumes or satiation. AMT reduces nausea after challenge with a high calorie liquid load.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2043-2050
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume103
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

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Amitriptyline
Stomach
Placebos
Satiation
Gastric Emptying
Healthy Volunteers
Nausea
Nociceptive Pain
Somatoform Disorders
Tricyclic Antidepressive Agents
Dyspepsia
Visual Analog Scale
Chronic Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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Effects of amitriptyline on gastric sensorimotor function and postprandial symptoms in healthy individuals : A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. / Bouras, Ernest P.; Talley, Nicholas J.; Camilleri, Michael; Burton, Duane D.; Heckman, Michael G.; Crook, Juliana; Richelson, Elliott.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 103, No. 8, 08.2008, p. 2043-2050.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Low-dose tricyclic antidepressants have been used to treat chronic somatic and gastrointestinal pain disorders, including refractory functional dyspepsia. However, there are only limited data on the effects of these drugs on upper gastrointestinal function. AIM: To compare the effects of two doses of amitriptyline (AMT) and placebo on gastric accommodation, emptying, satiation, and postprandial symptoms in healthy volunteers. METHODS: Using a parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 41 healthy volunteers were randomized to AMT 25 mg, AMT 50 mg, or placebo for 2 wk. During the final 3 days of therapy, the following end points were assessed: fasting and postprandial gastric volumes, 2- and 4-h gastric emptying, time and volume to maximum satiation using a nutrient drink test, and postprandial symptoms 30 min later using 10-cm visual analog scales. AMT and metabolite levels were measured. RESULTS: AMT slowed gastric emptying at 2 h (median 75{\%} for placebo, 57{\%} for AMT 25 mg, 67{\%} for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.037) and 4 h (median 98{\%} for placebo, 96{\%} for AMT 25 mg, 92{\%} for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.003). AMT did not affect gastric volumes or satiation volume, but it did reduce nausea scores at 30 min in a dose-dependent manner (median 2.1 for placebo, 0.9 for AMT 25 mg, and 0.0 for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.009). CONCLUSION: In healthy volunteers, AMT slows gastric emptying of solids, but it does not significantly affect gastric volumes or satiation. AMT reduces nausea after challenge with a high calorie liquid load.",
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AU - Burton, Duane D.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Low-dose tricyclic antidepressants have been used to treat chronic somatic and gastrointestinal pain disorders, including refractory functional dyspepsia. However, there are only limited data on the effects of these drugs on upper gastrointestinal function. AIM: To compare the effects of two doses of amitriptyline (AMT) and placebo on gastric accommodation, emptying, satiation, and postprandial symptoms in healthy volunteers. METHODS: Using a parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 41 healthy volunteers were randomized to AMT 25 mg, AMT 50 mg, or placebo for 2 wk. During the final 3 days of therapy, the following end points were assessed: fasting and postprandial gastric volumes, 2- and 4-h gastric emptying, time and volume to maximum satiation using a nutrient drink test, and postprandial symptoms 30 min later using 10-cm visual analog scales. AMT and metabolite levels were measured. RESULTS: AMT slowed gastric emptying at 2 h (median 75% for placebo, 57% for AMT 25 mg, 67% for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.037) and 4 h (median 98% for placebo, 96% for AMT 25 mg, 92% for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.003). AMT did not affect gastric volumes or satiation volume, but it did reduce nausea scores at 30 min in a dose-dependent manner (median 2.1 for placebo, 0.9 for AMT 25 mg, and 0.0 for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.009). CONCLUSION: In healthy volunteers, AMT slows gastric emptying of solids, but it does not significantly affect gastric volumes or satiation. AMT reduces nausea after challenge with a high calorie liquid load.

AB - BACKGROUND: Low-dose tricyclic antidepressants have been used to treat chronic somatic and gastrointestinal pain disorders, including refractory functional dyspepsia. However, there are only limited data on the effects of these drugs on upper gastrointestinal function. AIM: To compare the effects of two doses of amitriptyline (AMT) and placebo on gastric accommodation, emptying, satiation, and postprandial symptoms in healthy volunteers. METHODS: Using a parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 41 healthy volunteers were randomized to AMT 25 mg, AMT 50 mg, or placebo for 2 wk. During the final 3 days of therapy, the following end points were assessed: fasting and postprandial gastric volumes, 2- and 4-h gastric emptying, time and volume to maximum satiation using a nutrient drink test, and postprandial symptoms 30 min later using 10-cm visual analog scales. AMT and metabolite levels were measured. RESULTS: AMT slowed gastric emptying at 2 h (median 75% for placebo, 57% for AMT 25 mg, 67% for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.037) and 4 h (median 98% for placebo, 96% for AMT 25 mg, 92% for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.003). AMT did not affect gastric volumes or satiation volume, but it did reduce nausea scores at 30 min in a dose-dependent manner (median 2.1 for placebo, 0.9 for AMT 25 mg, and 0.0 for AMT 50 mg; P = 0.009). CONCLUSION: In healthy volunteers, AMT slows gastric emptying of solids, but it does not significantly affect gastric volumes or satiation. AMT reduces nausea after challenge with a high calorie liquid load.

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