Effects of age on the glucose metabolic changes in mild cognitive impairment

Kejal M Kantarci, M. L. Senjem, Val Lowe, H. J. Wiste, S. D. Weigand, B. J. Kemp, A. R. Frank, M. M. Shiung, Bradley F Boeve, David S Knopman, Ronald Carl Petersen, Clifford R Jr. Jack

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Decreased glucose metabolism in the temporal and parietal lobes on FDG-PET is recognized as an early imaging marker for the AD pathology. Our objective was to investigate the effects of age on FDG-PET findings in aMCI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients with aMCI at 55-86 years of age (median = 73 years) and 25 age- and sex-matched CN subjects underwent FDG-PET. SPM5 was used to compare the FDG uptake in patients in aMCI-old (>73 years) and aMCI-young (≤73 years) groups with CN subjects. The findings in the aMCI-old patients were independently validated in a separate cohort of 10 aMCI and 13 CN subjects older than 73 years of age. RESULTS: The pattern of decreased glucose metabolism and gray matter atrophy in the medial temporal, posterior cingulate, precuneus, lateral parietal, and temporal lobes in aMCI-young subjects was consistent with the typical pattern observed in AD. The pattern of glucose metabolic changes in aMCI-old subjects was different, predominantly involving the frontal lobes and the left parietal lobe. Gray matter atrophy in aMCI-old subjects was less pronounced than that in the aMCI-young subjects, involving the hippocampus and the basal forebrain in both hemispheres CONCLUSIONS: Pathologic heterogeneity may be underlying the absence of AD-like glucose metabolic changes in older compared with younger patients with aMCI. This may be an important consideration for the clinical use of temporoparietal hypometabolism on FDG-PET as a marker for early diagnosis of AD in aMCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1247-1253
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

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Parietal Lobe
Glucose
Temporal Lobe
Atrophy
Gyrus Cinguli
Frontal Lobe
Early Diagnosis
Hippocampus
Pathology
Cognitive Dysfunction
Gray Matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Effects of age on the glucose metabolic changes in mild cognitive impairment. / Kantarci, Kejal M; Senjem, M. L.; Lowe, Val; Wiste, H. J.; Weigand, S. D.; Kemp, B. J.; Frank, A. R.; Shiung, M. M.; Boeve, Bradley F; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald Carl; Jack, Clifford R Jr.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 31, No. 7, 08.2010, p. 1247-1253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Decreased glucose metabolism in the temporal and parietal lobes on FDG-PET is recognized as an early imaging marker for the AD pathology. Our objective was to investigate the effects of age on FDG-PET findings in aMCI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients with aMCI at 55-86 years of age (median = 73 years) and 25 age- and sex-matched CN subjects underwent FDG-PET. SPM5 was used to compare the FDG uptake in patients in aMCI-old (>73 years) and aMCI-young (≤73 years) groups with CN subjects. The findings in the aMCI-old patients were independently validated in a separate cohort of 10 aMCI and 13 CN subjects older than 73 years of age. RESULTS: The pattern of decreased glucose metabolism and gray matter atrophy in the medial temporal, posterior cingulate, precuneus, lateral parietal, and temporal lobes in aMCI-young subjects was consistent with the typical pattern observed in AD. The pattern of glucose metabolic changes in aMCI-old subjects was different, predominantly involving the frontal lobes and the left parietal lobe. Gray matter atrophy in aMCI-old subjects was less pronounced than that in the aMCI-young subjects, involving the hippocampus and the basal forebrain in both hemispheres CONCLUSIONS: Pathologic heterogeneity may be underlying the absence of AD-like glucose metabolic changes in older compared with younger patients with aMCI. This may be an important consideration for the clinical use of temporoparietal hypometabolism on FDG-PET as a marker for early diagnosis of AD in aMCI.",
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T1 - Effects of age on the glucose metabolic changes in mild cognitive impairment

AU - Kantarci, Kejal M

AU - Senjem, M. L.

AU - Lowe, Val

AU - Wiste, H. J.

AU - Weigand, S. D.

AU - Kemp, B. J.

AU - Frank, A. R.

AU - Shiung, M. M.

AU - Boeve, Bradley F

AU - Knopman, David S

AU - Petersen, Ronald Carl

AU - Jack, Clifford R Jr.

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N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Decreased glucose metabolism in the temporal and parietal lobes on FDG-PET is recognized as an early imaging marker for the AD pathology. Our objective was to investigate the effects of age on FDG-PET findings in aMCI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients with aMCI at 55-86 years of age (median = 73 years) and 25 age- and sex-matched CN subjects underwent FDG-PET. SPM5 was used to compare the FDG uptake in patients in aMCI-old (>73 years) and aMCI-young (≤73 years) groups with CN subjects. The findings in the aMCI-old patients were independently validated in a separate cohort of 10 aMCI and 13 CN subjects older than 73 years of age. RESULTS: The pattern of decreased glucose metabolism and gray matter atrophy in the medial temporal, posterior cingulate, precuneus, lateral parietal, and temporal lobes in aMCI-young subjects was consistent with the typical pattern observed in AD. The pattern of glucose metabolic changes in aMCI-old subjects was different, predominantly involving the frontal lobes and the left parietal lobe. Gray matter atrophy in aMCI-old subjects was less pronounced than that in the aMCI-young subjects, involving the hippocampus and the basal forebrain in both hemispheres CONCLUSIONS: Pathologic heterogeneity may be underlying the absence of AD-like glucose metabolic changes in older compared with younger patients with aMCI. This may be an important consideration for the clinical use of temporoparietal hypometabolism on FDG-PET as a marker for early diagnosis of AD in aMCI.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Decreased glucose metabolism in the temporal and parietal lobes on FDG-PET is recognized as an early imaging marker for the AD pathology. Our objective was to investigate the effects of age on FDG-PET findings in aMCI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients with aMCI at 55-86 years of age (median = 73 years) and 25 age- and sex-matched CN subjects underwent FDG-PET. SPM5 was used to compare the FDG uptake in patients in aMCI-old (>73 years) and aMCI-young (≤73 years) groups with CN subjects. The findings in the aMCI-old patients were independently validated in a separate cohort of 10 aMCI and 13 CN subjects older than 73 years of age. RESULTS: The pattern of decreased glucose metabolism and gray matter atrophy in the medial temporal, posterior cingulate, precuneus, lateral parietal, and temporal lobes in aMCI-young subjects was consistent with the typical pattern observed in AD. The pattern of glucose metabolic changes in aMCI-old subjects was different, predominantly involving the frontal lobes and the left parietal lobe. Gray matter atrophy in aMCI-old subjects was less pronounced than that in the aMCI-young subjects, involving the hippocampus and the basal forebrain in both hemispheres CONCLUSIONS: Pathologic heterogeneity may be underlying the absence of AD-like glucose metabolic changes in older compared with younger patients with aMCI. This may be an important consideration for the clinical use of temporoparietal hypometabolism on FDG-PET as a marker for early diagnosis of AD in aMCI.

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