Effects of age, breast feeding, and household structure on Haemophilus influenzae type b disease risk and antibody acquisition in alaskan eskimos

Gloria M. Petersen, Diana R. Silimperi, Chung Yin Chiu, Joel I. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease occurs with unusually high incidence in Alaskan Eskimos. In 1983, the authors evaluated the unique susceptibility of the Yupik-speaking Eskimo population in southwest Alaska. A matched case-control design was used to assess the influence of age, breast feeding, and household composition on disease risk, with a historical cohort design to evaluate their effects on acquisition of Hib anticapsular antibody. The authors studied 103 cases with known invasive Hib disease that occurred at a mean age of 8.7 ± 8.6 months; healthy controls were matched for age and village of residence. Living in extended families at the time of disease onset was significantly associated with Hib disease (p < 0.04; odds ratio = 1.8; 95% confidence interval 0.87-3.25). The authors found that breast feeding was significantly less common among cases than controls (p < 0.03; odds ratio = 0.53; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.98). Although there was a positive correlation between age and acquired level of total anticapsular antibody (r = 0.59; p < 0.0001), previous exposure to invasive Hib disease did not influence these levels. Household crowding and breast feeding also did not appear to affect Hib antibody acquisition. Am J Epidemiol 1991;134:1212-21.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1212-1221
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume134
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 1991

Keywords

  • Antibodies
  • Bacterial
  • Breast feeding
  • Eskimos
  • Haemophilus influenzae
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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